Using tailored interventions to enhance smoking cessation among African-Americans at a community health center.

Published

Journal Article

This prospective randomized study examined the impact of three tailored intervention approaches to increase quitting rates among African-American smokers who were clients of a community health center that serves primarily low-income and indigent persons. Smokers were randomized to one of three groups: (1) health care provider prompting intervention alone, (2) health care provider prompting intervention with tailored print communications, and (3) health care provider prompting intervention with tailored print communications and tailored telephone counseling. Among the 160 smokers who completed the study, 35 (21.8%) had quit smoking at follow-up. Smokers who received the provider prompting intervention with tailored print materials were more likely to report having quit than smokers who received the provider intervention alone (32.7% vs. 13.2%, p < 0.05). Smokers who received all three intervention components were not more likely to report having quit at follow-up than those who only received the provider intervention (19.2% vs. 13.2%). Smokers who at baseline were less educated, smoked less than half a pack of cigarettes per day, had a stronger desire to quit, felt more efficacious, and had thought about quitting were more likely to report having quit at follow-up. These results provide support for continued refinement of tailored communications to aid smoking cessation among African-American smokers.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Lipkus, IM; Lyna, PR; Rimer, BK

Published Date

  • March 1999

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 1 / 1

Start / End Page

  • 77 - 85

PubMed ID

  • 11072391

Pubmed Central ID

  • 11072391

Electronic International Standard Serial Number (EISSN)

  • 1469-994X

International Standard Serial Number (ISSN)

  • 1469-994X

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1080/14622299050011181

Language

  • eng