Learning the sound system of Japanese: What does it tell us about language acquisition?

Published

Journal Article

Infants learn much about the phonology of their own language during the first year of their lives. To date, however, the vast majority of the research on infant speech perception has been carried out with infants learning English and other European languages, and we know very little about how infants learning other languages learn the sound system of their languages. The phonological characteristics of Japanese differ from English and other European languages in important ways, and investigation of its acquisition has a potential of shedding important light onto our understanding of phonological acquisition. In this paper, we present data from Japanese are presented to exemplify this point; acquisition of mora-timed rhythm, edge-prominent prosody, lexical pitch-accent and segmental distribution.

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Mazuka, R

Published Date

  • December 1, 2010

Published In

  • 20th International Congress on Acoustics 2010, Ica 2010 Incorporating Proceedings of the 2010 Annual Conference of the Australian Acoustical Society

Volume / Issue

  • 5 /

Start / End Page

  • 4186 - 4193

Citation Source

  • Scopus