Efficacy and safety of fluticasone propionate 0.005% ointment in the treatment of psoriasis.

Published

Journal Article

Two multicenter, double-blind, randomized, vehicle-controlled parallel-group trials involving 388 patients were conducted to compare the efficacy and safety of fluticasone propionate 0.005% ointment to those of its vehicle in the treatment of moderate-to-severe psoriasis. The study medication (up to 100 gm/week) was applied topically to the affected target areas of the body twice daily for up to four consecutive weeks. Efficacy and safety were evaluated after one, two, three, and four weeks of treatment. In both studies, fluticasone ointment was clearly shown to be superior to vehicle throughout the four weeks of treatment. At the end of the treatment period, the superiority of fluticasone ointment was statistically significant for all efficacy measures. At the end of study 1, the skin of ten of eighty-eight patients (11%) who received fluticasone were rated as cleared by the investigators and fifty (57%) were rated as excellent or good. Of those who received vehicle, the skin of one of ninety (1%) was rated cleared and twenty-five (28%) were rated excellent or good. In study 2, the skin of three of 105 (3%) patients who received fluticasone were rated as cleared and sixty-nine (66%) were rated as excellent or good at the end of the study. Of those who were treated with vehicle, no patient's skin was rated cleared and thirty of 100 (30%) were rated excellent or good. Adverse events were few and mild. The most common drug-related adverse events were burning and pruritus at the site of application, which occurred in 6% of both the fluticasone-treated patients and those who received vehicle. These findings support the conclusion that fluticasone, 0.005%, ointment is clinically superior to its vehicle in the treatment of psoriasis.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Olsen, EA

Published Date

  • February 1996

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 57 / 2 Suppl

Start / End Page

  • 57 - 61

PubMed ID

  • 8646872

Pubmed Central ID

  • 8646872

International Standard Serial Number (ISSN)

  • 0011-4162

Language

  • eng

Conference Location

  • United States