Adoption of information technology by resident physicians.

Published

Journal Article

The Internet represents a technological revolution that is transforming our society. In the healthcare industry, physicians have been typified as slow adopters of information technology. However, young physicians, having been raised in a computer-prevalent society, may be more likely to embrace technology. We attempt to characterize the use and acceptance of the Internet and information technology among resident physicians in a large academic medical center and to assess concerns regarding privacy, security, and credibility of information on the Internet. A 41-question survey was distributed to 150 pediatric, medical, and surgical residents at an urban, academic medical center. One hundred thirty-five residents completed the survey (response rate of 90%). Responses were evaluated and statistical analysis was done. The majority of resident physicians in our survey have adopted the tools of information technology. Ninety-eight percent used the Internet and 96% use e-mail. Two-thirds of the respondents used the Internet for healthcare-related purposes and a similar percentage thought that the Internet has affected their practice of medicine positively. The majority of residents thought that Internet healthcare services such as electronic medical records, peer-support websites, and remote patient monitoring would be beneficial for the healthcare industry. However, they are concerned about the credibility, privacy, and security of health and medical information online. The majority of resident physicians in our institution use Internet and information technology in their practice of medicine. Most think that the Internet will continue to have a beneficial role in the healthcare industry.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Parekh, SG; Nazarian, DG; Lim, CK

Published Date

  • April 2004

Published In

Start / End Page

  • 107 - 111

PubMed ID

  • 15123934

Pubmed Central ID

  • 15123934

International Standard Serial Number (ISSN)

  • 0009-921X

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1097/01.blo.0000126865.22310.59

Language

  • eng

Conference Location

  • United States