Quantitative cerebral anatomy in depression. A controlled magnetic resonance imaging study.

Journal Article

Magnetic resonance imaging was used to examine cerebral anatomy in 48 inpatients with severe depression who were referred for electroconvulsive therapy and in 76 normal control subjects. The magnetic resonance imaging measures included determinations of regional cerebral volumes and ratings of the frequency and severity of cortical atrophy, lateral ventricular enlargement, and subcortical hyperintensity. The mean total frontal lobe volume was found to be 7% smaller in the inpatients with severe depression (235.88 mL) than in the normal control subjects (254.32 mL)--a difference that was statistically significant even after adjusting for the effects of age, sex, education, and intracranial size. No group differences were observed in the volumes of the cerebral hemispheres, the temporal lobes, or the amygdala-hippocampal complex, nor in the frequency of cortical atrophy. Neither did the groups differ with respect to the total volumes of the lateral and third ventricles, nor in the frequency of lateral ventricular enlargement. Patients with depression had a significantly higher frequency of subcortical hyperintensity in the periventricular white matter, with an odds ratio of 5.32.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Coffey, CE; Wilkinson, WE; Weiner, RD; Parashos, IA; Djang, WT; Webb, MC; Figiel, GS; Spritzer, CE

Published Date

  • January 1, 1993

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 50 / 1

Start / End Page

  • 7 - 16

PubMed ID

  • 8422224

International Standard Serial Number (ISSN)

  • 0003-990X

Language

  • eng

Conference Location

  • United States