Limb preservation with isolated limb infusion for locally advanced nonmelanoma cutaneous and soft-tissue malignant neoplasms.

Published

Journal Article

To demonstrate the efficacy of isolated limb infusion (ILI) in limb preservation for patients with locally advanced soft-tissue sarcomas and nonmelanoma cutaneous malignant neoplasms.Locally advanced nonmelanoma cutaneous and soft-tissue malignant neoplasms, including soft-tissue sarcomas of the extremities, can pose significant treatment challenges. We report our experience, including responses and limb preservation rates, using ILI in cutaneous and soft-tissue malignant neoplasms.We identified 22 patients with cutaneous and soft-tissue malignant neoplasms who underwent 26 ILIs with melphalan and dactinomycin from January 1, 2004, through December 31, 2009, from 5 institutions. Outcome measures included limb preservation and in-field response rates. Regional toxic effects were measured using the Wieberdink scale and serum creatinine phosphokinase levels.The median age was 70 years (range, 19-92 years), and 12 patients (55%) were women. Fourteen patients (64%) had sarcomas, 7 (32%) had Merkel cell carcinoma, and 1 (5%) had squamous cell carcinoma. The median length of stay was 5.5 days (interquartile range, 4-8 days). Twenty-five of the 26 ILIs (96%) resulted in Wieberdink grade III or less toxicity, and 1 patient (4%) developed grade IV toxicity. The median serum creatinine phosphokinase level was 127 U/L for upper extremity ILIs and 93 U/L for lower extremity ILIs. Nineteen of 22 patients (86%) underwent successful limb preservation. The 3-month in-field response rate was 79% (21% complete and 58% partial), and the median follow-up was 8.6 months (range, 1-63 months). Five patients underwent resection of disease after an ILI, of whom 80% are disease free at a median of 8.6 months.Isolated limb infusion provides an attractive alternative therapy for regional disease control and limb preservation in patients with limb-threatening cutaneous and soft-tissue malignant neoplasms. Short-term response rates appear encouraging, yet durability of response is unknown.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Turaga, KK; Beasley, GM; Kane, JM; Delman, KA; Grobmyer, SR; Gonzalez, RJ; Letson, GD; Cheong, D; Tyler, DS; Zager, JS

Published Date

  • July 2011

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 146 / 7

Start / End Page

  • 870 - 875

PubMed ID

  • 21768436

Pubmed Central ID

  • 21768436

Electronic International Standard Serial Number (EISSN)

  • 1538-3644

International Standard Serial Number (ISSN)

  • 0004-0010

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1001/archsurg.2011.139

Language

  • eng