Renal outcomes in hypertensive Black patients at high cardiovascular risk.

Published

Journal Article

The ACCOMPLISH trial (Avoiding Cardiovascular events through Combination therapy in Patients Living with Systolic Hypertension) was a 3-year multicenter, event-driven trial involving patients with high cardiovascular risk who were randomized in a double-blinded manner to benazepril plus either hydrochlorothiazide or amlodipine and titrated in parallel to reach recommended blood pressure goals. Of the 8125 participants in the United States, 1414 were of self-described Black ethnicity. The composite kidney disease end point, defined as a doubling in serum creatinine, end-stage renal disease, or death was not different between Black and non-Black patients, although the Blacks were significantly more likely to develop a greater than 50% increase in serum creatinine to a level above 2.6 mg/dl. We found important early differences in the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) due to acute hemodynamic effects, indicating that benazepril plus amlodipine was more effective in stabilizing eGFR compared to benazepril plus hydrochlorothiazide in non-Blacks. There was no difference in the mean eGFR loss in Blacks between therapies. Thus, benazepril coupled to amlodipine was a more effective antihypertensive treatment than when coupled to hydrochlorothiazide in non-Black patients to reduced kidney disease progression. Blacks have a modestly higher increased risk for more advanced increases in serum creatinine than non-Blacks.

Full Text

Cited Authors

  • Weir, MR; Bakris, GL; Weber, MA; Dahlof, B; Devereux, RB; Kjeldsen, SE; Pitt, B; Wright, JT; Kelly, RY; Hua, TA; Hester, RA; Velazquez, E; Jamerson, KA

Published Date

  • March 2012

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 81 / 6

Start / End Page

  • 568 - 576

PubMed ID

  • 22189843

Pubmed Central ID

  • 22189843

Electronic International Standard Serial Number (EISSN)

  • 1523-1755

International Standard Serial Number (ISSN)

  • 0085-2538

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1038/ki.2011.417

Language

  • eng