Cell-autonomous death of cerebellar purkinje neurons with autophagy in niemann-pick type C disease

Published

Journal Article

Niemann-Pick type C is a neurodegenerative lysosomal storage disorder caused by mutations in either of two genes, npc1 and npc2. Cells lacking Npc1, which is a transmembrane protein related to the Hedgehog receptor Patched, or Npc2, which is a secreted cholesterol-binding protein, have aberrant organelle trafficking and accumulate large quantities of cholesterol and other lipids. Though the Npc proteins are produced by all cells, cerebellar Purkinje neurons are especially sensitive to loss of Npc function. Since Niemann-Pick type C disease involves circulating molecules such as sterols and steroids and a robust inflammatory response within the brain parenchyma, it is crucial to determine whether external factors affect the survival of Purkinje cells (PCs). We investigated the basis of neurodegeneration in chimeric mice that have functional npc1 in only some cells. Death of mutant npc1 cells was not prevented by neighboring wild-type cells, and wild-type PCs were not poisoned by surrounding mutant npc1 cells. PCs undergoing cell-autonomous degeneration have features consistent with autophagic cell death. Chimeric mice exhibited a remarkable delay and reduction of wasting and ataxia despite their substantial amount of mutant tissue and dying cells, revealing a robust mechanism that partially compensates for massive PC death. © 2005 Ko et al.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Ko, DC; Milenkovic, L; Beier, SM; Manuel, H; Buchanan, JA; Scott, MP

Published Date

  • July 1, 2005

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 1 / 1

Start / End Page

  • 0081 - 0095

Electronic International Standard Serial Number (EISSN)

  • 1553-7404

International Standard Serial Number (ISSN)

  • 1553-7390

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1371/journal.pgen.0010007

Citation Source

  • Scopus