Ethnic differences in mental illness and mental health service use among Black fathers.

Published

Journal Article

OBJECTIVES: We have presented nationally representative data on the prevalence and correlates of mental illness and mental health service use among African American and Caribbean Black (US-born and foreign-born) fathers in the United States. METHODS: We have reported national estimates of lifetime and 12-month prevalence rates of mental illness, correlates, and service use among African American (n = 1254) and Caribbean Black (n = 633) fathers using data from the National Survey of American Life, a national household survey of Black Americans. We used bivariate cross-tabulations and Cox proportional hazards regression approaches and adjusted for the National Survey of American Life's complex sample design. RESULTS: The prevalence of mental illness, sociodemographic correlates, and service use among Black fathers varied by ethnicity and nativity. US-born Caribbean Black fathers had alarmingly high rates of most disorders, including depression, anxiety, and substance disorders. Mental health service use was particularly low for African American and foreign-born Caribbean Black fathers. CONCLUSIONS: These results demonstrate the need for more research on the causes and consequences of mental illness and the help-seeking behavior of ethnically diverse Black fathers.

Full Text

Cited Authors

  • Doyle, O; Joe, S; Caldwell, CH

Published Date

  • May 2012

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 102 Suppl 2 /

Start / End Page

  • S222 - S231

PubMed ID

  • 22401518

Pubmed Central ID

  • 22401518

Electronic International Standard Serial Number (EISSN)

  • 1541-0048

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.2105/AJPH.2011.300446

Language

  • eng

Conference Location

  • United States