The protein composition of the digestive fluid from the venus flytrap sheds light on prey digestion mechanisms.

Published

Journal Article

The Venus flytrap (Dionaea muscipula) is one of the most well-known carnivorous plants because of its unique ability to capture small animals, usually insects or spiders, through a unique snap-trapping mechanism. The animals are subsequently killed and digested so that the plants can assimilate nutrients, as they grow in mineral-deficient soils. We deep sequenced the cDNA from Dionaea traps to obtain transcript libraries, which were used in the mass spectrometry-based identification of the proteins secreted during digestion. The identified proteins consisted of peroxidases, nucleases, phosphatases, phospholipases, a glucanase, chitinases, and proteolytic enzymes, including four cysteine proteases, two aspartic proteases, and a serine carboxypeptidase. The majority of the most abundant proteins were categorized as pathogenesis-related proteins, suggesting that the plant's digestive system evolved from defense-related processes. This in-depth characterization of a highly specialized secreted fluid from a carnivorous plant provides new information about the plant's prey digestion mechanism and the evolutionary processes driving its defense pathways and nutrient acquisition.

Full Text

Cited Authors

  • Schulze, WX; Sanggaard, KW; Kreuzer, I; Knudsen, AD; Bemm, F; Thøgersen, IB; Bräutigam, A; Thomsen, LR; Schliesky, S; Dyrlund, TF; Escalante-Perez, M; Becker, D; Schultz, J; Karring, H; Weber, A; Højrup, P; Hedrich, R; Enghild, JJ

Published Date

  • November 2012

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 11 / 11

Start / End Page

  • 1306 - 1319

PubMed ID

  • 22891002

Pubmed Central ID

  • 22891002

Electronic International Standard Serial Number (EISSN)

  • 1535-9484

International Standard Serial Number (ISSN)

  • 1535-9476

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1074/mcp.M112.021006

Language

  • eng