Tactile/kinesthetic stimulation effects on preterm neonates.

Published

Journal Article

Tactile/kinesthetic stimulation was given to 20 preterm neonates (mean gestational age, 31 weeks; mean birth weight, 1,280 g; mean time in neonatal intensive care unit, 20 days) during transitional ("grower") nursery care, and their growth, sleep-wake behavior, and Brazelton scale performance was compared with a group of 20 control neonates. The tactile/kinesthetic stimulation consisted of body stroking and passive movements of the limbs for three, 15-minute periods per day for a 10 days. The stimulated neonates averaged a 47% greater weight gain per day (mean 25 g v 17 g), were more active and alert during sleep/wake behavior observations, and showed more mature habituation, orientation, motor, and range of state behavior on the Brazelton scale than control infants. Finally, their hospital stay was 6 days shorter, yielding a cost savings of approximately $3,000 per infant. These data suggest that tactile/kinesthetic stimulation may be a cost effective way of facilitating growth and behavioral organization even in very small preterm neonates.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Field, TM; Schanberg, SM; Scafidi, F; Bauer, CR; Vega-Lahr, N; Garcia, R; Nystrom, J; Kuhn, CM

Published Date

  • May 1, 1986

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 77 / 5

Start / End Page

  • 654 - 658

PubMed ID

  • 3754633

Pubmed Central ID

  • 3754633

International Standard Serial Number (ISSN)

  • 0031-4005

Language

  • eng

Conference Location

  • United States