Factors influencing initial larval settlement: temporal, spatial and surface molecular components

Published

Journal Article

The impact of initial surface chemistry on settlement of barnacle, bryozoan, and hydroid larvae was assessed. Temporal (on a scale of weeks to months) and fine scale spatial (centimeter to meter) variation in settlement were quantified. Four arrays of silanized glass surfaces, deployed at ≈2-wk intervals, were monitored after 1 and 3 days of immersion. Settlement of all larval types exhibited strong temporal variation. There was a 25, 22- and 18-fold difference between the highest and lowest Day 1 settlement for barnacles, bryozoans and hydroids, respectively. Bryozoan and hydroid settlement was spatially variable, barnacle settlement was not. Barnacle and bryozoan settlement was influenced by inttial surface chemistry, hydroid settlement was not. For barnacles, there was a 2-fold difference between total settlement over the four arrays on untreated glass and diphenyl-silanized surfaces; for bryozoans, there was a 51-fold difference, and in the opposite direction. There was a negative correlation between barnacle and bryozoan settlement with respect to surface. This result was independent of the presence of the other species. Bryozoan settlement was also spatially and temporally quantified in a separate, single surface 56-h array, and total bryozoan settlement ·h-1 was found to be correlated with light intensity. Patterns of initial colonization were strongly influenced by surface chemistry and spatial temporal variation in larval supply. These effects on initial colonization may influence subsequent community development. © 1991.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Roberts, D; Rittschof, D; Holm, E; Schmidt, AR

Published Date

  • August 9, 1991

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 150 / 2

Start / End Page

  • 203 - 221

International Standard Serial Number (ISSN)

  • 0022-0981

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1016/0022-0981(91)90068-8

Citation Source

  • Scopus