Light to moderate alcohol consumption is associated with lower frequency of hypertransaminasemia.

Published

Journal Article

OBJECTIVES: The effect of light to moderate alcohol consumption on the liver is controversial. To determine the association between light to moderate alcohol consumption and frequency of hypertransaminasemia, a cross-sectional and a subsequent longitudinal cohort study were conducted using annual health checkup data at a Japanese workplace. METHODS: We analyzed 1,177 male subjects (age 20-59) without HCV or HBV infection or other chronic liver diseases. To determine the association between alcohol consumption (none or minimal <70 g/wk, light > or =70 g and <140 g/wk, moderate > or =140 g and <280 g/wk, excessive > or =280 g/wk) and hypertransaminasemia, we performed multiple logistic regressions. We then followed 326 subjects without a history of fatty liver or hypertransaminasemia up to 5 years for incidental hypertransaminasemia and performed Cox proportional hazard regressions. RESULTS: Excess alcohol consumption was associated with increased odds of hypertransaminasemia (adjusted odds ratio [AOR]versus none or minimal consumption 1.4[1.1-1.93], P= 0.023). There was significant interaction between age group and alcohol consumption (P < 0.01). In the younger group, moderate consumption was associated with decreased odds (AOR 0.5 [0.3-0.9], P= 0.032), while in the older group, light consumption was associated with decreased odds (AOR 0.6 [0.4-1.0], P= 0.036) and excess consumption was associated with increased odds (AOR 1.6 [1.1-2.3], P= 0.014) of hypertransaminasemia. During follow-up, moderate consumption was associated with decreased incidence of hypertransaminasemia versus none or minimal consumption (adjusted hazard ratio 0.4 [0.1-0.9], P= 0.02). CONCLUSION: Light to moderate alcohol consumption may protect against the development of hypertransaminasemia among male subjects without other liver conditions. Further studies are required before recommending light to moderate alcohol consumption.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Suzuki, A; Angulo, P; St Sauver, J; Muto, A; Okada, T; Lindor, K

Published Date

  • September 2007

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 102 / 9

Start / End Page

  • 1912 - 1919

PubMed ID

  • 17509032

Pubmed Central ID

  • 17509032

International Standard Serial Number (ISSN)

  • 0002-9270

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1111/j.1572-0241.2007.01274.x

Language

  • eng

Conference Location

  • United States