A feasibility study to evaluate pelvic peritoneal anatomy with a saline intraperitoneal sonogram (SIPS).

Journal Article (Clinical Trial;Journal Article)

Objective

To prove the safety and feasibility of evaluating pelvic anatomy with a new imaging technique called saline intraperitoneal sonogram (SIPS).

Design

Prospective clinical case series.

Setting

Outpatient fertility clinic.

Patient(s)

Ten women with unexplained infertility and normal hysterosalpingograms (HSG). Five women with no known risk factors and five women with known risk factors for adhesive disease were enrolled.

Intervention(s)

Step 1 required performing a sonohysterogram. Step 2 involved directing a 17-g oocyte retrieval needle into a pocket of peritoneal fluid under ultrasound guidance and infusing normal saline. The pelvic anatomy was evaluated with the three-dimensional and four-dimensional mode on pelvic ultrasound.

Main outcome measure(s)

Technical feasibility, safety, time, fluid infusion, and deficit volumes.

Result(s)

All 10 patients successfully completed the protocol. One of the five women with no risk factors for adhesive disease and a normal HSG was discovered to have a unilateral hydrosalpinx and filmy adhesive disease on SIPS. Both findings were confirmed on laparoscopy. Three out of the five women with known risk factors had abnormal SIPS imaging and were confirmed on laparoscopy to have significant adhesive disease. The average procedure time was 45 minutes (±15 minutes).

Conclusion(s)

This study demonstrates that SIPS is a safe, quick, and potentially cost-effective method for evaluating pelvic adhesive disease in an outpatient facility in women with unexplained infertility and a normal HSG.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Shah, AA; Walmer, DK

Published Date

  • December 2010

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 94 / 7

Start / End Page

  • 2766 - 2768

PubMed ID

  • 20542264

Electronic International Standard Serial Number (EISSN)

  • 1556-5653

International Standard Serial Number (ISSN)

  • 0015-0282

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1016/j.fertnstert.2010.04.066

Language

  • eng