Mast cell interleukin-10 drives localized tolerance in chronic bladder infection.

Published

Journal Article

The lower urinary tract's virtually inevitable exposure to external microbial pathogens warrants efficient tissue-specialized defenses to maintain sterility. The observation that the bladder can become chronically infected in combination with clinical observations that antibody responses after bladder infections are not detectable suggest defects in the formation of adaptive immunity and immunological memory. We have identified a broadly immunosuppressive transcriptional program specific to the bladder, but not the kidney, during infection of the urinary tract that is dependent on tissue-resident mast cells (MCs). This involves localized production of interleukin-10 and results in suppressed humoral and cell-mediated responses and bacterial persistence. Therefore, in addition to the previously described role of MCs orchestrating the early innate immunity during bladder infection, they subsequently play a tissue-specific immunosuppressive role. These findings may explain the prevalent recurrence of bladder infections and suggest the bladder as a site exhibiting an intrinsic degree of MC-maintained immune privilege.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Chan, CY; St John, AL; Abraham, SN

Published Date

  • February 15, 2013

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 38 / 2

Start / End Page

  • 349 - 359

PubMed ID

  • 23415912

Pubmed Central ID

  • 23415912

Electronic International Standard Serial Number (EISSN)

  • 1097-4180

International Standard Serial Number (ISSN)

  • 1074-7613

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1016/j.immuni.2012.10.019

Language

  • eng