Urinary tract infections in meningioma patients: Analysis of risk factors and outcomes

Journal Article

Background: Urinary tract infections (UTIs) account for about 35% of all nosocomial infections and 75% are associated with the use of urethral catheters. Aim: The goal of this study was to evaluate preoperative factors associated with the risk of UTI and to estimate the impact of UTIs on patient outcome and resource utilization. Methods: Adult meningioma patients treated with craniotomy in US hospitals between 2002 and 2007 were queried from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS) database. Univariate and multivariate analyses that correct for sample survey design data were used to study the association of perioperative UTIs and outcomes. Findings: In all, 46,344 patients were included. Women comprised the majority (70.0%), had lower mortality (1.2% vs 2.0%), shorter in-hospital stay (6.7 vs 7.5 days), lower hospital charges (US$76,682 vs 87,220) and higher UTI rates (6.3% vs 3.9%) than men. In multivariate analysis, female gender (odds ratio: 2.2; P < 0.0001), older age (1.4; P < 0.001), emergency room admissions (1.8; P < 0.0001), total length of stay (1.08; P < 0.0001), comorbidity score (1.04; P = 0.0147), postoperative fluid abnormalities (1.96; P < 0.0001) and pulmonary complications (1.3; P < 0.0011) were associated with UTI. UTI was associated with an additional 2.3 days of hospital stay and an incremental US$18,920 in hospital charges. Conclusions: Perioperative UTIs are associated with specific comorbidities and postoperative complications. They significantly increase in-hospital length of stay and costs. Our data emphasize the need to support national efforts that are underway to reduce hospital-acquired UTIs within the neurosurgical population. © 2012 The Healthcare Infection Society.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Nosova, K; Nuño, M; Mukherjee, D; Lad, SP; Boakye, M; Black, KL; Patil, CG

Published Date

  • 2013

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 83 / 2

Start / End Page

  • 132 - 139

International Standard Serial Number (ISSN)

  • 0195-6701

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1016/j.jhin.2012.10.011