Emergency provider analgesic practices and attitudes toward patients with sickle cell disease.

Published

Journal Article

We determine whether emergency provider attitudes and demographics are associated with adherence to national guidelines for the management of acute sickle cell disease pain.We conducted a cross-sectional survey of emergency providers at the 2011 annual American College of Emergency Physicians Scientific Assembly, using a validated instrument to assess provider attitudes and self-reported analgesic practices toward patients with sickle cell disease. Multivariable, relative risk regressions were used to identify factors associated with adherence to guidelines.There were 722 eligible participants, with a 93% complete response rate. Most providers self-reported adherence to the cornerstones of sickle cell disease pain management, including parenteral opioids (90%) and redosing opioids within 30 minutes if analgesia is inadequate (85%). Self-reported adherence was lower for other recommendations, including use of patient-controlled analgesia, acetaminophen, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and hypotonic fluids for euvolemic patients. Emergency providers in the highest quartile of negative attitudes were 20% less likely to redose opioids within 30 minutes for inadequate analgesia (risk ratio 0.8; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.7 to 0.9). High-volume providers (those who treat more than 1 sickle cell disease patient per week), were less likely to redose opioids within 30 minutes for inadequate analgesia (risk ratio 0.9; 95% CI 0.8 to 0.9). Pediatric providers were 6.6 times more likely to use patient-controlled analgesia for analgesia (95% CI 2.6 to 16.6).The majority of emergency providers report that they adhere to national guidelines about use of opioids for sickle cell disease-related acute pain episodes. Other recommendations have less penetration. Negative attitudes toward individuals with sickle cell disease are associated with lower adherence to guidelines.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Glassberg, JA; Tanabe, P; Chow, A; Harper, K; Haywood, C; DeBaun, MR; Richardson, LD

Published Date

  • October 2013

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 62 / 4

Start / End Page

  • 293 - 302.e10

PubMed ID

  • 23561465

Pubmed Central ID

  • 23561465

Electronic International Standard Serial Number (EISSN)

  • 1097-6760

International Standard Serial Number (ISSN)

  • 0196-0644

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1016/j.annemergmed.2013.02.004

Language

  • eng