Blood pressure control in a hypertension telemedicine intervention: does distance to primary care matter?

Published

Journal Article

Although telemedicine may help overcome geographic access barriers, it is unknown whether rural patients receive greater benefits. In a secondary analysis of 503 veterans participating in a hypertension telemedicine study, the authors hypothesized that patients with greater travel distances would have greater improvements in 18-month systolic blood pressure (SBP). Patients were categorized by telemedicine exposure and travel distance to primary care, derived from zip codes. Comparisons were (1) usual care (UC), distance <30 miles (reference); (2) UC, distance ≥30 miles; (3) telemedicine, distance <30 miles; (4) telemedicine, distance ≥30 miles. Compared with patients receiving UC, distance <30 miles (intercept=127.7), no difference in 18-month SBP was observed in patients receiving UC, distance ≥30 miles (0.13 mm Hg, 95% confidence interval [-6.6 to 6.8]); telemedicine, distance <30 miles (-1.1 mm Hg [-7.3 to 5.2]); telemedicine, distance ≥30 miles (-0.80 mm Hg [-6.6 to 5.1]). Although telemedicine may help overcome geographic access barriers, additional studies are needed to identify patients most likely to benefit.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Bowen, ME; Bosworth, HB; Roumie, CL

Published Date

  • October 2013

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 15 / 10

Start / End Page

  • 723 - 730

PubMed ID

  • 24088280

Pubmed Central ID

  • 24088280

Electronic International Standard Serial Number (EISSN)

  • 1751-7176

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1111/jch.12172

Language

  • eng

Conference Location

  • United States