Goal pursuit, now and later: Temporal compatibility of different versus similar means

Published

Journal Article

Compatibility between the degree of similarity among means to goal attainment and the anticipated timing of goal pursuit increases goal-directed motivation. Six studies demonstrate that consumers are more motivated and willing to pay for means to goal attainment in the near term when they plan to use a set of different (vs. similar) means. In contrast, consumers are more motivated and willing to pay for means to goal attainment in the long term when they plan to use similar (vs. different) means. For example, consumers paid more fora personal training session when told it would include exercises for different (similar) muscle groups and would take place this week (next month). These effects are driven by the ease of processing differences (similarities) when considering the near (far) future. Similar results were obtained across various domains, including health and fitness, saving money, and academic performance. ©2012 by JOURNAL OF CONSUMER RESEARCH, Inc. All rights reserved.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Etkin, J; Ratner, RK

Published Date

  • February 1, 2013

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 39 / 5

Start / End Page

  • 1085 - 1099

International Standard Serial Number (ISSN)

  • 0093-5301

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1086/667203

Citation Source

  • Scopus