Neuromonics™ Tinnitus Treatment: preliminary experience in a private practice setting.

Published

Conference Paper

EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVE: At the conclusion of this presentation, the participants should be able to identify the principles behind the Neuromonics™ Tinnitus Treatment (NTT) and understand its strengths and potential shortfalls. OBJECTIVES: To describe the preliminary experience and efficacy of the NTT in an independent, non-industry sponsored private otology practice clinical study. STUDY DESIGN: Case series with retrospective chart review and post-intervention quality of life questionnaire. METHODS: Tinnitus Reaction Questionnaire (TRQ) scores, and awareness and disturbance scores, were obtained pre- and post-treatment. A posttreatment questionnaire based on the Glasgow Benefit Inventory (GBI) was conducted over the telephone. RESULTS: Eleven patients had completed the six-month program at the time of the study. Nine of the eleven patients completing therapy were considered "highly suitable". TRQ scores were universally improved (ranging from a 3 to 78% decrease in the TRQ score). However, only two of the seven (29%) had achieved a decrease in the TRQ score by 40% or more. Seven of ten patients (70%), and four of ten (40%) patients reported a reduction in the percentage of the time they were aware of and disturbed by their tinnitus, respectively. Eight of ten patients (80%) exhibited positive scores on the GBI (mean 17.39, median 7.81, range -3.1 to 67.6). When asked whether they thought the device was worth the cost, responses were divided equally between positive and negative responses. CONCLUSION: Neuromonics ™ Tinnitus Treatment appears to be a practical and promising treatment for tinnitus.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Jang, DW; Johnson, E; Chandrasekhar, SS

Published Date

  • 2010

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 120 Suppl 4 /

Start / End Page

  • S208 -

PubMed ID

  • 21225806

Pubmed Central ID

  • 21225806

Electronic International Standard Serial Number (EISSN)

  • 1531-4995

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1002/lary.21675

Conference Location

  • United States