Tobacco use among Asian Americans, Native Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders, and mixed-race individuals: 2002-2010

Journal Article

Background: Non-Hispanic Asian Americans, Native Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders (NHs/PIs), and mixed-race individuals are the fastest growing segments of the US population. We examined prevalences and correlates of tobacco use among these understudied groups. Prevalences among whites were included as a comparison. Methods: Data were drawn from the 2002-2010 National Surveys on Drug Use and Health. Respondents aged ≥12 years were assessed for current (past-month) use of cigarettes, cigars, smokeless tobacco (chewing tobacco, snuff), and pipe tobacco. Respondents' race/ethnicity, age, sex, household income, government assistance, urbanicity of residence, residential stability, self-rated health, alcohol use, and drug use were examined as correlates. Results: Between 2002 and 2010, there was a decline in the prevalence of cigarette smoking among whites (26.9% in 2002; 24.3% in 2010) and Asian Americans (18.0% in 2002; 11.1% in 2010). Prevalence of pipe tobacco use among mixed-race individuals increased from 0.2% in 2002 to 1.6% in 2010; there was little change in the prevalence of cigar and smokeless tobacco use in these racial/ethnic groups. Adjusted analyses showed that, compared with Asian Americans, mixed-race individuals had greater odds of using four tobacco products, and NHs/PIs had greater odds of using cigarettes, cigars, and smokeless tobacco. Regardless of race/ethnicity, male sex was a correlate of use of cigars, smokeless tobacco, and pipe tobacco; alcohol and drug use increased the odds of cigarette and cigar smoking. Conclusions: These new findings show prevalent tobacco use among NHs/PIs and mixed-race individuals, and highlight the importance of including these populations in future research and reporting. © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Wu, LT; Swartz, MS; Burchett, B; Workgroup, NIDAAAPI; Blazer, DG

Published Date

  • 2013

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 132 / 1-2

Start / End Page

  • 87 - 94

International Standard Serial Number (ISSN)

  • 0376-8716

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2013.01.008