PHYSIOLOGICAL MEASURES OF THEORETICAL CONCEPTS: SOME IDEAS FOR LINKING DEFLECTION AND EMOTION TO PHYSICAL RESPONSES DURING INTERACTION

Journal Article (Review)

After a vigorous debate in the late 1970s, the sociology of emotion put aside most discussion of whether or not the physiological arousal associated with emotion labels is differentiated. Since this early period, scholars have made great progress on two fronts. First, theories about the interrelationship of identity, action and emotion have specified a family of new concepts related to emotion. Second, a large corpus of research on the physiological correlates of emotional experience emerged. In this chapter, we review the well-developed control theories of identity and emotion, and focus on the key concepts that might relate to different physiological states. We then review the general classes of physiological measures, discussing their reliability, intrusiveness and other features that might determine their usefulness for tracking responses to social interaction. We then offer a highly provisional mapping of physiological measures onto the concepts that they might potentially measure, given past research about how these physiological processes relate to environmental stimuli. While any linkage between concepts and measures must be speculative at this point, we hope that this review will serve as a stimulus to theoretically guided research that begins to assess the validity of these new measures for sociological use. © 2004 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Robinson, DT; Rogalin, CL; Smith-Lovin, L

Published Date

  • December 1, 2004

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 21 /

Start / End Page

  • 77 - 115

International Standard Serial Number (ISSN)

  • 0882-6145

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1016/S0882-6145(04)21004-9

Citation Source

  • Scopus