Selecting renal replacement therapies: what do African American and non-African American patients and their families think others should know? A mixed methods study.

Published online

Journal Article

BACKGROUND: Little is known regarding the types of information African American and non-African American patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and their families need to inform renal replacement therapy (RRT) decisions. METHODS: In 20 structured group interviews, we elicited views of African American and non-African American patients with CKD and their families about factors that should be addressed in educational materials informing patients' RRT selection decisions. We asked participants to select factors from a list and obtained their open-ended feedback. RESULTS: Ten groups of patients (5 African American, 5 non-African American; total 68 individuals) and ten groups of family members (5 African American, 5 non-African American; total 62 individuals) participated. Patients and families had a range (none to extensive) of experiences with various RRTs. Patients identified morbidity or mortality, autonomy, treatment delivery, and symptoms as important factors to address. Family members identified similar factors but also cited the effects of RRT decisions on patients' psychological well-being and finances. Views of African American and non-African American participants were largely similar. CONCLUSIONS: Educational resources addressing the influence of RRT selection on patients' morbidity and mortality, autonomy, treatment delivery, and symptoms could help patients and their families select RRT options closely aligned with their values. Including information about the influence of RRT selection on patients' personal relationships and finances could enhance resources' cultural relevance for African Americans.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • DePasquale, N; Ephraim, PL; Ameling, J; Lewis-Boyér, L; Crews, DC; Greer, RC; Rabb, H; Powe, NR; Jaar, BG; Gimenez, L; Auguste, P; Jenckes, M; Boulware, LE

Published Date

  • January 14, 2013

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 14 /

Start / End Page

  • 9 -

PubMed ID

  • 23317336

Pubmed Central ID

  • 23317336

Electronic International Standard Serial Number (EISSN)

  • 1471-2369

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1186/1471-2369-14-9

Language

  • eng

Conference Location

  • England