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Selected Presentations & Appearances


“‘Project Vox and Early Modern Women’s Collaborations in the Arts” - Women in Art and Music: An Early Modern Global Conference · October 21, 2023 International Meeting or Conference Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts, National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC

Co-presented with Meredith Graham and Yasemin Altun

“‘The Mistress Art’: Architectural Treatises and Women as Patrons and Architects in Seicento Rome” - Southeastern College Art Conference · October 28, 2022 International Meeting or Conference Baltimore, Maryland
“Artemisia Gentileschi and Bathsheba’s Black Maid: Intersectionality in Italian Baroque Art” - Intersectionality in the Early Global World · May 20, 2022 International Meeting or Conference UCLA Center for Early Global Studies,
“The Early Female Audience of Donatello’s Judith and Holofernes at the Palazzo Medici, 1455–1495” - The New College Conference on Medieval and Renaissance Studies · March 2022 International Meeting or Conference

Awarded The Snyder Prize for best paper by a junior scholar in 2020; presentation postponed to 2022 due to pandemic.

“Mapping Migrations of Italian Women Artists, 1500-1700” · February 10, 2021 - February 13, 2021 International Meeting or Conference College Art Association Conference, Virtual
“‘Project Vox and Early Modern Women’s Collaborations in the Arts” - Women in Art and Music: An Early Modern Global Conference · October 21, 2023 International Meeting or Conference Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts, National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC

Co-presented with Meredith Graham and Yasemin Altun

“‘The Mistress Art’: Architectural Treatises and Women as Patrons and Architects in Seicento Rome” - Southeastern College Art Conference · October 28, 2022 International Meeting or Conference Baltimore, Maryland
“Artemisia Gentileschi and Bathsheba’s Black Maid: Intersectionality in Italian Baroque Art” - Intersectionality in the Early Global World · May 20, 2022 International Meeting or Conference UCLA Center for Early Global Studies,
“The Early Female Audience of Donatello’s Judith and Holofernes at the Palazzo Medici, 1455–1495” - The New College Conference on Medieval and Renaissance Studies · March 2022 International Meeting or Conference

Awarded The Snyder Prize for best paper by a junior scholar in 2020; presentation postponed to 2022 due to pandemic.

“Mapping Migrations of Italian Women Artists, 1500-1700” · February 10, 2021 - February 13, 2021 International Meeting or Conference College Art Association Conference, Virtual
"Mimesis as a Form of Invenzione: A Reconsideration of Rivalry within an Artistic Lineage" · October 16, 2019 - October 19, 2019 International Meeting or Conference Southeastern College Art Conference, Chattanooga, Tennessee

In Quattrocento Florence, artists were challenged to master an imitation of nature while at the same time expressing an inherent invenzione. Three Master painters of the Florentine School are
stylistically and biographically connected: Fra Filippo Lippi was the teacher of Sandro Botticelli, who later was the instructor of Lippi’s son Filippino. This paper will systematically group narrative
paintings produced by this artistic lineage to investigate the forces that shaped stylistic choices. Reviving a biographical approach with an emphasis on master-pupil emulation and rivalry, I explore
how each of these three artists created unique solutions to the artistic problem of realistically rendering the human and the divine.
Using the subject of the Annunciation as a case study, each artist’s practice will be analyzed for its mimesis, invenzione and adherence to contemporary painting tradition. From the visual
evidence of the comparative analysis of these Annunciation scenes and a review of Quattrocento Florentine workshop practice, I conclude that there is a more complex story to tell than that of three generations of mere discipleship. I propose that the mastery of mimesis made possible an expression of invenzione as the two elements of artistic technique intertwined and advanced each other.

“Representations of Judith on 15th C. Cassoni: Exhorting the Heroic Female Identity in Service of Civic Duty” · October 17, 2018 - October 20, 2018 International Meeting or Conference Southeastern College Art Conference, Birmingham, Alabama

Renaissance marriage chests (cassoni) were domestic objects which conveyed moral lessons about gendered public and familial identities to the bride. One popular subject of these narrative chests was that of biblical Judith, a woman of exemplary feminine virtue, who demonstrated courage and masculine prowess in order to save her community. Previous scholars have justified her significance in domestic representations by citing her character and her special relationship to the civic identity of Florence. However, few have addressed the complicating factor of her model of female strength in a patriarchal society, counter to typical cassone narratives emphasizing obedience. This study explores possible motivations for selecting the multidimensional character of Judith as an exemplum virtutis, and examines the diverse range of representations of her story on cassone. I propose that this surprising narrative choice communicated traditional feminine virtues while also serving as a model for elite noblewomen negotiating shifting identities as wives, mothers, and widows. Though the narrative’s gender inversions had the potential to challenge male leadership, artistic conventions of cassone representations de-emphasized the violence and agency of Judith’s act, and emphasized her humility. These representations offered role flexibility for elite noblewomen to navigate gendered power structures in service to their communities.

“From Arms to Letters: Presenting Masculinity in the Child Portraits of Giovanni de’ Medici, Cardinal-Prince” · March 8, 2018 - March 10, 2018 International Meeting or Conference The New College Conference on Medieval and Renaissance Studies, Sarasota, Florida

Duke Cosimo I de’ Medici commissioned portraits of his children throughout his reign (1537-74); the majority depict his second son, Giovanni (1543-62) as exceptional through the inclusion of atypical and often overlooked attributes. Though some of Giovanni's portraits have been studied individually, there has been no focus on their significance as a group, allowing for new consideration of unique choices of representation that departed from contemporary conventions. Examination of nine childhood portraits captures the transition of a boy in infanzia (age 0-7) bearing arms to a man-child in puerizia (age 7-14) with letters. From infancy, Giovanni was positioned for a dual destiny; either as a leader of Florence or the Church. Giovanni’s desired trajectory demanded unusually complex representation through a visual campaign crafted to broadcast his exceptionalism. Created in cinquecento Florence during a period of diplomatic exchange between the Medici and the papal court, Giovanni’s portraits are analyzed in comparison to those of Italian and European peers. Presenting an alternate model of humanist maturity and masculinity, his portraits can be viewed as an attempt by the Medici to distinguish themselves from other princely families. Evaluation of this visual campaign suggests that the Medici developed a formula of representation directed toward the pope rather than the Emperor, in their desire to use Giovanni as a vehicle to promote Medici power in Rome. These findings indicate that the comparative analysis of child portraits in sequence in addition to evaluation in isolation may yield new readings and information about patron intent.