Proteome and calcium-related gene expression in Pinus massoniana needles in response to acid rain under different calcium levels

Journal Article

Aims: Calcium (Ca) is a crucial regulator of plant growth, development and stress responses. Acid rain (AR), a serious environmental issue worldwide, leaches away Ca from surrounding soils and affects vegetation. The objective of this study was to investigate how different Ca levels affect protein and RNA expression of calcium-related genes under AR stress. Methods: Pinus massoniana seedlings grown at high, medium, and low Ca levels under AR stress were used for proteomics analysis. Furthermore, relative mRNA levels of eight Ca-related genes and their interaction network were analyzed by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) and bioinformatic analysis. Results: Proteomic studies identified 95 differentially expressed proteins which were classified into eight groups, including metabolic processes, photosynthesis, and cell rescue and defense, etc. Moreover, qRT-PCR results indicated that low Ca significantly increased the expression level of the investigated Ca-related genes, which can be reversed by high Ca under AR stress. Conclusions: Defense system, gene transcription and translation, photosynthetic machinery, and substance and energy metabolism may play important roles in the responses of P. massoniana to AR stress. Low Ca increases the abundance of cell rescue and defense-related proteins under AR. High Ca can reduce AR damage by increasing the abundance of proteins involved in the Calvin cycle, glycolysis, TCA cycle, and nitrogen metabolism. Our results indicated a possible mechanism involving Ca in AR tolerance in plants. © 2014 Springer International Publishing Switzerland.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Hu, WJ; Chen, J; Liu, TW; Wu, Q; Wang, WH; Liu, X; Shen, ZJ; Simon, M; Chen, J; Wu, FH; Pei, ZM; Zheng, HL

Published Date

  • January 1, 2014

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 380 / 1

Start / End Page

  • 285 - 303

International Standard Serial Number (ISSN)

  • 0032-079X

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1007/s11104-014-2086-9

Citation Source

  • Scopus