Occupational risk factors for low back pain among drivers of three-wheelers in Sri Lanka.

Published

Journal Article

BACKGROUND: Approximately 5% of all households in Sri Lanka operate a three-wheeler as their primary source of income. However, very little is known about the occupational health risks associated with driving these vehicles. OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to assess occupational risk factors, including the number of hours worked associated with the 4-week prevalence of low back pain (LBP) among drivers of three-wheelers. METHODS: Questionnaires were administered to 200 full-time drivers of three-wheelers from the Galle District in Sri Lanka. Occupational, psychological, socio-demographic, lifestyle, and anthropometric variables were collected. Univariate and multivariate analysis were used to investigate the correlation between occupational risk factors of the prevalence of LBP. RESULTS: 15·5% of respondents reported experiencing LBP in the previous 4 months. Univariate analysis revealed that the number of hours worked per week, feeling pressure to compete with other drivers, and perceived stress scale scores were significantly associated with the 4-week prevalence of LBP. Multivariate analysis found that the number of hours worked per week and engine type were significantly associated with LBP. CONCLUSIONS: LBP is common among drivers of three-wheelers in Sri Lanka. Long work hours and two-stroke engines were significantly associated with LBP. Results from this study point towards a role for educational, behavioral health, and policy interventions to help prevent and reduce LBP among these drivers.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Noda, M; Malhotra, R; DeSilva, V; Sapukotana, P; DeSilva, A; Kirkorowicz, J; Allen, J; Østbye, T

Published Date

  • July 2015

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 21 / 3

Start / End Page

  • 216 - 224

PubMed ID

  • 25133353

Pubmed Central ID

  • 25133353

Electronic International Standard Serial Number (EISSN)

  • 2049-3967

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1179/2049396714Y.0000000071

Language

  • eng

Conference Location

  • England