Subjective status shapes political preferences.

Published

Journal Article

Economic inequality in America is at historically high levels. Although most Americans indicate that they would prefer greater equality, redistributive policies aimed at reducing inequality are frequently unpopular. Traditional accounts posit that attitudes toward redistribution are driven by economic self-interest or ideological principles. From a social psychological perspective, however, we expected that subjective comparisons with other people may be a more relevant basis for self-interest than is material wealth. We hypothesized that participants would support redistribution more when they felt low than when they felt high in subjective status, even when actual resources and self-interest were held constant. Moreover, we predicted that people would legitimize these shifts in policy attitudes by appealing selectively to ideological principles concerning fairness. In four studies, we found correlational (Study 1) and experimental (Studies 2-4) evidence that subjective status motivates shifts in support for redistributive policies along with the ideological principles that justify them.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Brown-Iannuzzi, JL; Lundberg, KB; Kay, AC; Payne, BK

Published Date

  • January 2015

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 26 / 1

Start / End Page

  • 15 - 26

PubMed ID

  • 25416138

Pubmed Central ID

  • 25416138

Electronic International Standard Serial Number (EISSN)

  • 1467-9280

International Standard Serial Number (ISSN)

  • 0956-7976

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1177/0956797614553947

Language

  • eng