Work and home stress: associations with anxiety and depression symptoms.

Published

Journal Article

BACKGROUND: In the evolving work environment of global competition, the associations between work and home stress and psychological well-being are not well understood. AIMS: To examine the impact of psychosocial stress at work and at home on anxiety and depression. METHODS: In medically healthy employed men and women (aged 30-60), serial regression analyses were used to determine the independent association of psychosocial stress at work and at home with depression symptoms, measured using the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II), and anxiety symptoms, measured using the Spielberger Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI). Psychosocial stress at work was measured using the Job Content Questionnaire to assess job psychological demands, job control, job social support and job insecurity. Psychosocial stress at home was assessed by 12 questions including stress at home, personal problems, family demands and feelings about home life. RESULTS: Serial regression analyses in 129 subjects revealed that job insecurity and home stress were most strongly associated with depression and anxiety symptoms. Job insecurity accounted for 9% of the variation both in BDI-II scores and in STAI scores. Home stress accounted for 13 and 17% of the variation in BDI-II scores and STAI scores, respectively. In addition, job social support was significantly and independently associated with STAI scores but not BDI-II scores. CONCLUSIONS: Work and home stress were associated with anxiety and depression symptoms in both men and women. Both work and home stress should be considered in studies evaluating anxiety and depression in working populations.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Fan, L-B; Blumenthal, JA; Watkins, LL; Sherwood, A

Published Date

  • March 2015

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 65 / 2

Start / End Page

  • 110 - 116

PubMed ID

  • 25589707

Pubmed Central ID

  • 25589707

Electronic International Standard Serial Number (EISSN)

  • 1471-8405

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1093/occmed/kqu181

Language

  • eng

Conference Location

  • England