Living alongside more affluent neighbors predicts greater involvement in antisocial behavior among low-income boys.

Published

Journal Article

The creation of economically mixed communities has been proposed as one way to improve the life outcomes of children growing up in poverty. However, whether low-income children benefit from living alongside more affluent neighbors is unknown.Prospectively gathered data on over 1,600 children from the Environmental Risk (E-Risk) Longitudinal Twin Study living in urban environments is used to test whether living alongside more affluent neighbors (measured via high-resolution geo-spatial indices) predicts low-income children's antisocial behavior (reported by mothers and teachers at the ages of 5, 7, 10, and 12).Results indicated that low-income boys (but not girls) surrounded by more affluent neighbors had higher levels of antisocial behavior than their peers embedded in concentrated poverty. The negative effect of growing up alongside more affluent neighbors on low-income boys' antisocial behavior held across childhood and after controlling for key neighborhood and family-level factors.Findings suggest that efforts to create more economically mixed communities for children, if not properly supported, may have iatrogenic effects on boys' antisocial behavior.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Odgers, CL; Donley, S; Caspi, A; Bates, CJ; Moffitt, TE

Published Date

  • October 2015

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 56 / 10

Start / End Page

  • 1055 - 1064

PubMed ID

  • 25611118

Pubmed Central ID

  • 25611118

Electronic International Standard Serial Number (EISSN)

  • 1469-7610

International Standard Serial Number (ISSN)

  • 0021-9630

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1111/jcpp.12380

Language

  • eng