A biomechanical comparison of initial fixation strength of 3 different methods of anterior cruciate ligament soft tissue graft tibial fixation: resistance to monotonic and cyclic loading.

Journal Article (Journal Article)

Background

Tibial fixation of soft tissue grafts continues to be problematic in the early postoperative period after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

Hypothesis

No differences exist for resistance to slippage of soft tissue grafts fixed with CentraLoc, Intrafix, or 35-mm bioabsorbable interference screws.

Study design

Controlled laboratory study.

Methods

Bovine tibia and hoof extensor tendons were divided into 3 matched groups with 12 tibia and 12 extensor tendons in each group. Within each group, 6 specimens underwent monotonic loading to failure (1 mm/s), and 6 underwent cyclic loading (10,000 cycles, 125-325 N, 1 Hz).

Results

No statistically significant differences were noted in mean load to failure or stiffness. The mean load to failure (and stiffness) for the 3 types of fixation were as follows: bioabsorbable interference screw, 631.6 +/- 130.1 N (88.17 +/- 6.79 N/mm); Intrafix, 644.3 +/- 195.2 N (81.65 +/- 16.5 N/mm); and CentraLoc, 791.1 +/- 72.7 N (77.89 +/- 7.07 N/mm). The slippage rates under cyclic loading for the 3 types of fixation were bioabsorbable interference screw, 0.336 +/- 0.074 microm/cycle; Intrafix, 27.2 +/- 31.6 microm/cycle; and CentraLoc, 0.0355 +/- 0.0046 microm/cycle. In this model, CentraLoc proved statistically superior in resistance to cyclic loading compared with the bioabsorbable interference screw (P < .05) and Intrafix (P < .0001). The bioabsorbable interference screw proved statistically superior to Intrafix in resistance to cyclic loading (P < .05).

Conclusions

In this bovine model, CentraLoc and bioabsorbable interference screws provided superior resistance to cyclic loading compared with Intrafix.

Clinical relevance

CentraLoc and bioabsorbable interference screws showed superior resistance to cyclic loading, which may indicate an increased resistance to clinical failure.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Bartz, RL; Mossoni, K; Tyber, J; Tokish, J; Gall, K; Siparsky, PN

Published Date

  • June 2007

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 35 / 6

Start / End Page

  • 949 - 954

PubMed ID

  • 17435059

Pubmed Central ID

  • 17435059

Electronic International Standard Serial Number (EISSN)

  • 1552-3365

International Standard Serial Number (ISSN)

  • 0363-5465

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1177/0363546507301881

Language

  • eng