How bacterial cell division might cheat turgor pressure - a unified mechanism of septal division in Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria.

Published

Journal Article (Review)

An important question for bacterial cell division is how the invaginating septum can overcome the turgor force generated by the high osmolarity of the cytoplasm. I suggest that it may not need to. Several studies in Gram-negative bacteria have shown that the periplasm is isoosmolar with the cytoplasm. Indirect evidence suggests that this is also true for Gram-positive bacteria. In this case the invagination of the septum takes place within the uniformly high osmotic pressure environment, and does not have to fight turgor pressure. A related question is how the V-shaped constriction of Gram-negative bacteria relates to the plate-like septum of Gram-positive bacteria. I collected evidence that Gram-negative bacteria have a latent capability of forming plate-like septa, and present a model in which septal division is the basic mechanism in both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Erickson, HP

Published Date

  • August 2017

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 39 / 8

PubMed ID

  • 28699183

Pubmed Central ID

  • 28699183

Electronic International Standard Serial Number (EISSN)

  • 1521-1878

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1002/bies.201700045

Language

  • eng

Conference Location

  • United States