Anti-hypertensive medications and injurious falls in an older population of low socioeconomic status: a nested case-control study.

Published online

Journal Article

BACKGROUND: This study aimed to determine whether the number of anti-hypertensive medication classes or any change in anti-hypertensive medication were associated with injurious fall among the community-dwelling older population of low socioeconomic status. METHODS: Using data from electronic medical records, we performed a nested case-control study among older Singapore residents (≥60) of low socioeconomic status (N = 210). Controls (n = 162) were matched to each case (n = 48) by age and gender. Variables with p < 0.10 in univariate analysis were included in multivariate analysis. We used conditional logistic regression to assess the associations of the number of anti-hypertensive medication classes and change in anti-hypertensive medication with injurious falls. We also performed stepwise regressions as sensitivity analyses. p < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. RESULTS: The mean (±SD) age of participants was 78.1 (± 8.33) years; 127 (60.4%) were female, 189 (90.0%) were Chinese. Those on ≥2 anti-hypertensive medication classes had an increased risk of experiencing an injurious fall compared to those not on any anti-hypertensive medication (OR = 5.45; CI:1.49-19.93; p = 0.01). Among those who were taking anti-hypertensive medication, those who had a change in the medication 180-day prior to injurious fall had a significantly increased risk of experiencing an injurious fall compared to those that did not report any change in anti-hypertensive medication (OR = 3.88; CI:1.23-12.19; p = 0.02). Sensitivity analyses generated consistent findings. CONCLUSION: Both ≥2 anti-hypertensive medication classes and change in anti-hypertensive medication were associated with an increased risk of experiencing an injurious fall among the older population of low socioeconomic status. Our findings could guide prescribers to exercise caution in the initiation of anti-hypertensive medications or in making medication changes, especially among the older population of low socioeconomic status.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Banu, Z; Lim, KK; Kwan, YH; Yap, KZ; Ang, HT; Tan, CS; Fong, W; Thumboo, J; Lee, KH; Ostbye, T; Low, LL

Published Date

  • August 28, 2018

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 18 / 1

Start / End Page

  • 195 -

PubMed ID

  • 30153807

Pubmed Central ID

  • 30153807

Electronic International Standard Serial Number (EISSN)

  • 1471-2318

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1186/s12877-018-0871-7

Language

  • eng

Conference Location

  • England