Pediatric Neurogenic Bladder and Bowel Dysfunction: Will My Child Ever Be out of Diapers?

Journal Article (Journal Article;Systematic Review)

CONTEXT: Managing patient and parent expectations regarding urinary and fecal continence is important with congenital conditions that produce neurogenic bladder and bowel dysfunction. Physicians need to be aware of common treatment algorithms and expected outcomes to best counsel these families. OBJECTIVE: To systematically evaluate evidence regarding the utilization and success of various modalities in achieving continence, as well as related outcomes, in children with neurogenic bladder and bowel dysfunction. EVIDENCE ACQUISITION: We performed a systematic review of the literature in PubMed/Medline in August 2019. A total of 114 publications were included in the analysis, including 49 for bladder management and 65 for bowel management. EVIDENCE SYNTHESIS: Children with neurogenic bladder conditions achieved urinary continence 50% of the time, including 44% of children treated with nonsurgical methods and 64% with surgical interventions. Patients with neurogenic bowel problems achieved fecal continence 75% of the time, including 78% of patients treated with nonsurgical methods and 73% with surgical treatment. Surgical complications and need for revisions were high in both categories. CONCLUSIONS: Approximately half of children with neurogenic bladder dysfunction will achieve urinary continence and about three-quarters of children with neurogenic bowel dysfunction will become fecally continent. Surgical intervention can be successful in patients refractory to nonsurgical management, but the high complication and revision rates support their use as second-line therapy. This is consistent with guidelines issued by the International Children's Continence Society. PATIENT SUMMARY: Approximately half of children with neurogenic bladder dysfunction will achieve urinary continence, and about three-quarters of children with neurogenic bowel dysfunction will become fecally continent. Most children can be managed without surgery. Patients who do not achieve continence with nonsurgical methods frequently have success with operative procedures, but complications and requirements for additional procedures must be expected.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Johnston, AW; Wiener, JS; Todd Purves, J

Published Date

  • September 15, 2020

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 6 / 5

Start / End Page

  • 838 - 867

PubMed ID

  • 31982364

Electronic International Standard Serial Number (EISSN)

  • 2405-4569

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1016/j.euf.2020.01.003

Language

  • eng

Conference Location

  • Netherlands