The blood donor identity survey: a multidimensional measure of blood donor motivations.

Journal Article (Journal Article)

BACKGROUND: Evidence indicates that donor identity is an important predictor of donation behavior; however, prior studies have relied on diverse, unidimensional measures with limited psychometric support. The goals of this study were to examine the application of self-determination theory to blood donor motivations and to develop and validate a related multidimensional measure of donor identity. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: Items were developed and administered electronically to a sample of New York Blood Center (NYBC) donors (n=582) and then to a sample of Ohio University students (n=1005). Following initial confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) on the NYBC sample to identify key items related to self-determination theory's six motivational factors, a revised survey was administered to the university sample to reexamine model fit and to assess survey reliability and validity. RESULTS: Consistent with self-determination theory, for both samples CFAs indicated that the best fit to the data was provided by a six-motivational-factor model, including amotivation, external regulation, introjected regulation, identified regulation, integrated regulation, and intrinsic regulation. CONCLUSION: The Blood Donor Identity Survey provides a psychometrically sound, multidimensional measure of donor motivations (ranging from unmotivated to donate to increasing levels of autonomous motivation to donate) that is suitable for nondonors as well as donors with varying levels of experience. Future research is needed to examine longitudinal changes in donor identity and its relationship to actual donation behavior.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • France, CR; Kowalsky, JM; France, JL; Himawan, LK; Kessler, DA; Shaz, BH

Published Date

  • August 2014

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 54 / 8

Start / End Page

  • 2098 - 2105

PubMed ID

  • 24601946

Pubmed Central ID

  • 24601946

Electronic International Standard Serial Number (EISSN)

  • 1537-2995

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1111/trf.12588

Language

  • eng

Conference Location

  • United States