Differences in the nonverbal requests of great apes and human infants.

Journal Article (Journal Article)

This study investigated how great apes and human infants use imperative pointing to request objects. In a series of three experiments (infants, N = 44; apes, N = 12), subjects were given the opportunity to either point to a desired object from a distance or else to approach closer and request it proximally. The apes always approached close to the object, signaling their request through instrumental actions. In contrast, the infants quite often stayed at a distance, directing the experimenters' attention to the desired object through index-finger pointing, even when the object was in the open and they could obtain it by themselves. Findings distinguish 12-month-olds' imperative pointing from ontogenetic and phylogenetic earlier forms of ritualized reaching.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • van der Goot, MH; Tomasello, M; Liszkowski, U

Published Date

  • March 2014

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 85 / 2

Start / End Page

  • 444 - 455

PubMed ID

  • 23901779

Pubmed Central ID

  • 23901779

Electronic International Standard Serial Number (EISSN)

  • 1467-8624

International Standard Serial Number (ISSN)

  • 0009-3920

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1111/cdev.12141

Language

  • eng