FRAX without BMD can be used to risk-stratify Veterans who recently sustained a low trauma non-vertebral/non-hip fracture.

Journal Article (Journal Article)

We evaluated the fracture risk assessment tool (FRAX) without bone mineral density (BMD) in predicting treatment recommendations for patients with a recent low trauma fracture other than hip or vertebral. The concordance, sensitivity, and specificity were 75.6%, 67.3%, and 78.2%, respectively. FRAX without BMD can be used after a fracture to expedite treatment. INTRODUCTION: The objective of this study was to evaluate the performance of the fracture risk assessment tool (FRAX) without bone mineral density (BMD) in predicting treatment recommendations for patients who recently sustained a low trauma fracture other than hip or vertebral. METHODS: We utilized a clinical database established by the Fracture Liaison Service at the Durham Veterans Affairs Medical Center to identify male and female Veterans age ≥ 50 years who sustained a low trauma non-hip/non-vertebral fracture and underwent dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) between October 2013 and April 2018. FRAX without BMD (FRAX-BMI) and FRAX with BMD (FRAX-BMD) were calculated for the 229 patients identified, and whether or not they met the National Osteoporosis Foundation (NOF) guideline treatment thresholds was compared. RESULTS: There were 55 (24.0%) patients that met criteria for treatment based on NOF guideline established FRAX-BMD thresholds including 27 (11.8%) patients with osteoporosis by DXA. The concordance of FRAX-BMI in predicting treatment recommendations was 75.6% with a sensitivity of 67.3% and a specificity of 78.2%. The area under the curve (AUC) of FRAX-BMI hip fracture risk was 0.79. Assessment/treatment thresholds for hip fracture risk of 1% < FRAX-BMI < 4% were proposed to maximize sensitivity and specificity. CONCLUSION: Among patients who sustained a low trauma non-hip/non-vertebral fracture, FRAX-BMI can be used to stratify risk and identify high-risk patients who could be treated without DXA, low-risk patients who may not need treatment, and intermediate-risk patients to undergo DXA testing.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Sagalla, N; Colón-Emeric, C; Sloane, R; Lyles, K; Vognsen, J; Lee, R

Published Date

  • March 2021

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 32 / 3

Start / End Page

  • 467 - 472

PubMed ID

  • 32885318

Pubmed Central ID

  • PMC7930138

Electronic International Standard Serial Number (EISSN)

  • 1433-2965

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1007/s00198-020-05616-5

Language

  • eng

Conference Location

  • England