The Association Between Neighborhood Public Transportation Usage and Youth Physical Activity.

Journal Article (Journal Article)

INTRODUCTION: Routine adolescent physical activity is a well-established predictor of positive health across the lifespan, although wide disparities in youth physical activity engagement persist across sex and race/ethnicity. Transportation barriers may be related to adolescents' ability to access physical activity opportunities. This study examines the association between neighborhood public transportation usage and adolescent physical activity using a national sample. METHODS: Cross-sectional data were drawn from the Family Life, Activity, Sun, Health, and Eating study (2014), a national sample of adolescents aged 12-17 years. Linear regression examined the association between neighborhood public transportation usage on the basis of neighborhood-level public transportation use and individual-level youth moderate-to-vigorous physical activity minutes per week. Models were developed for weekday, weekend, and combined moderate-to-vigorous physical activity for all youth and across sex and race/ethnicity subgroups. Analyses were run in 2020. RESULTS: The final analytic data set included 1,247 adolescents aged 12-17 years (71% non-Hispanic White, 49% male, mean age=14.52 [SD=1.59] years). Adjusted models showed a stronger magnitude of association between high neighborhood public transportation usage and both weekday (β=8.79, 95% CI=1.00, 16.59) and combined (β=13.74, 95% CI=1.14, 26.35) moderate-to-vigorous physical activity than between low/moderate neighborhood public transportation usage and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity. The magnitude of the neighborhood public transportation usage-moderate-to-vigorous physical activity association was strongest among non-Hispanic Black and Hispanic adolescent girls. CONCLUSIONS: This study found an association between neighborhood public transportation usage and adolescent moderate-to-vigorous physical activity, particularly among non-Hispanic Black and Hispanic adolescent girls. Findings from this research have the potential to inform targeted interventions for promoting adolescent physical activity to ultimately reduce chronic health disparities across the lifespan.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Granados, I; Haderer, EL; D'Agostino, EM; Neshteruk, CD; Armstrong, SC; Skinner, AC

Published Date

  • November 2021

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 61 / 5

Start / End Page

  • 733 - 737

PubMed ID

  • 34400036

Electronic International Standard Serial Number (EISSN)

  • 1873-2607

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1016/j.amepre.2021.04.035

Language

  • eng

Conference Location

  • Netherlands