Are there differences in symptoms experienced by midlife climacteric women with and without metabolic syndrome? A scoping review.

Journal Article (Review;Journal Article)

Introduction

Midlife climacteric women with metabolic syndrome are at high risk for experiencing a complex array of symptoms. The aim of this scoping review was to identify the prevalence, types, and clustering of symptoms in midlife climacteric women with metabolic syndrome and to compare them to symptoms of midlife climacteric women without metabolic syndrome.

Methods

A three-step search method was used according to Joanna Briggs Institute methodology. Eligibility criteria of participants, concept, context, and types of evidence were selected in alignment with the review questions. Seven databases (PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, CINAHL, PsycINFO, ProQuest Dissertation & Theses, OpenGrey) were searched using search terms with no language or date restrictions. Title and abstract screening, full-text review, data charting, and data synthesis were conducted by two independent researchers based on the eligibility criteria.

Results

The search yielded 3813 studies after removing duplicates with 48 full-text papers assessed for eligibility. A total of eight studies were reviewed and analyzed which reported the prevalence and types of symptoms individually or grouped based on each body system. Midlife climacteric women with metabolic syndrome experience a wide prevalence of individual and grouped urogenital, vasomotor, psychological, sleep, and somatic symptoms. Mental exhaustion had the highest prevalence (84.4%) among the individual symptoms, and urogenital symptoms had the highest prevalence (81.3%) among the grouped symptoms. There were mixed findings on symptoms between midlife climacteric women with metabolic syndrome and without metabolic syndrome. No studies focused on symptom clusters.

Conclusion

Our findings will serve as a knowledge basis for understanding symptoms experienced by midlife climacteric women with metabolic syndrome. This new knowledge can assist clinicians in effectively assessing and managing their symptoms in clinical settings and inform future development of targeted symptom management interventions.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Min, SH; Yang, Q; Min, SW; Ledbetter, L; Docherty, SL; Im, E-O; Rushton, S

Published Date

  • January 2022

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 18 /

Start / End Page

  • 17455057221083817 -

PubMed ID

  • 35266423

Pubmed Central ID

  • PMC8918770

Electronic International Standard Serial Number (EISSN)

  • 1745-5065

International Standard Serial Number (ISSN)

  • 1745-5057

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1177/17455057221083817

Language

  • eng