Daptomycin versus standard therapy for bacteremia and endocarditis caused by Staphylococcus aureus.

Published

Journal Article

BACKGROUND: Alternative therapies for Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia and endocarditis are needed. METHODS: We randomly assigned 124 patients with S. aureus bacteremia with or without endocarditis to receive 6 mg of daptomycin intravenously per kilogram of body weight daily and 122 to receive initial low-dose gentamicin plus either an antistaphylococcal penicillin or vancomycin. The primary efficacy end point was treatment success 42 days after the end of therapy. RESULTS: Forty-two days after the end of therapy in the modified intention-to-treat analysis, a successful outcome was documented for 53 of 120 patients who received daptomycin as compared with 48 of 115 patients who received standard therapy (44.2 percent vs. 41.7 percent; absolute difference, 2.4 percent; 95 percent confidence interval, -10.2 to 15.1 percent). Our results met prespecified criteria for the noninferiority of daptomycin. The success rates were similar in subgroups of patients with complicated bacteremia, right-sided endocarditis, and methicillin-resistant S. aureus. Daptomycin therapy was associated with a higher rate of microbiologic failure than was standard therapy (19 vs. 11 patients, P=0.17). In 6 of the 19 patients with microbiologic failure in the daptomycin group, isolates with reduced susceptibility to daptomycin emerged; similarly, a reduced susceptibility to vancomycin was noted in isolates from patients treated with vancomycin. As compared with daptomycin therapy, standard therapy was associated with a nonsignificantly higher rate of adverse events that led to treatment failure due to the discontinuation of therapy (17 vs. 8, P=0.06). Clinically significant renal dysfunction occurred in 11.0 percent of patients who received daptomycin and in 26.3 percent of patients who received standard therapy (P=0.004). CONCLUSIONS: Daptomycin (6 mg per kilogram daily) is not inferior to standard therapy for S. aureus bacteremia and right-sided endocarditis. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00093067 [ClinicalTrials.gov].).

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Fowler, VG; Boucher, HW; Corey, GR; Abrutyn, E; Karchmer, AW; Rupp, ME; Levine, DP; Chambers, HF; Tally, FP; Vigliani, GA; Cabell, CH; Link, AS; DeMeyer, I; Filler, SG; Zervos, M; Cook, P; Parsonnet, J; Bernstein, JM; Price, CS; Forrest, GN; Fätkenheuer, G; Gareca, M; Rehm, SJ; Brodt, HR; Tice, A; Cosgrove, SE; S. aureus Endocarditis and Bacteremia Study Group,

Published Date

  • August 17, 2006

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 355 / 7

Start / End Page

  • 653 - 665

PubMed ID

  • 16914701

Pubmed Central ID

  • 16914701

Electronic International Standard Serial Number (EISSN)

  • 1533-4406

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1056/NEJMoa053783

Language

  • eng

Conference Location

  • United States