Clinical relevance of the primary findings of the MTA: success rates based on severity of ADHD and ODD symptoms at the end of treatment.

Published

Journal Article

OBJECTIVES: To develop a categorical outcome measure related to clinical decisions and to perform secondary analyses to supplement the primary analyses of the NIMH Collaborative Multisite Multimodal Treatment Study of Children With Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (MTA). METHOD: End-of-treatment status was summarized by averaging the parent and teacher ratings of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and oppositional defiant disorder symptoms on the Swanson, Nolan, and Pelham, version IV (SNAP-IV) scale, and low symptom-severity ("Just a Little") on this continuous measure was set as a clinical cutoff to form a categorical outcome measure reflecting successful treatment. Three orthogonal comparisons of the treatment groups (combined treatment [Comb], medication management [MedMgt], behavioral treatment [Beh], and community comparison [CC]) evaluated hypotheses about the MTA medication algorithm ("Comb + MedMgt versus Beh + CC"), multimodality superiority ("Comb versus MedMgt"), and psychosocial substitution ("Beh versus CC"). RESULTS: The summary of SNAP-IV ratings across sources and domains increased the precision of measurement by 30%. The secondary analyses of group differences in success rates (Comb = 68%; MedMgt = 56%; Beh = 34%; CC = 25%) confirmed the large effect of the MTA medication algorithm and a smaller effect of multimodality superiority, which was now statistically significant (p < .05). The psychosocial substitution effect remained negligible and nonsignificant. CONCLUSION: These secondary analyses confirm the primary findings and clarify clinical decisions about the choice between multimodal and unimodal treatment with medication.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Swanson, JM; Kraemer, HC; Hinshaw, SP; Arnold, LE; Conners, CK; Abikoff, HB; Clevenger, W; Davies, M; Elliott, GR; Greenhill, LL; Hechtman, L; Hoza, B; Jensen, PS; March, JS; Newcorn, JH; Owens, EB; Pelham, WE; Schiller, E; Severe, JB; Simpson, S; Vitiello, B; Wells, K; Wigal, T; Wu, M

Published Date

  • February 2001

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 40 / 2

Start / End Page

  • 168 - 179

PubMed ID

  • 11211365

Pubmed Central ID

  • 11211365

International Standard Serial Number (ISSN)

  • 0890-8567

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1097/00004583-200102000-00011

Language

  • eng

Conference Location

  • United States