Patient self-efficacy and spouse perception of spousal support are associated with lower patient weight: baseline results from a spousal support behavioral intervention.

Published

Journal Article

Obesity and related chronic illnesses are leading causes of death and excessive health care costs, necessitating identification of factors that can help patients achieve and maintain healthy weight. Greater self-efficacy and perceived spousal support in patients have been associated with successful weight management. The current study also assesses self-efficacy and perceived support in spouses and whether these factors are related to patient weight. At baseline of a spousal support trial, patients and spouses (N = 255 couples) each completed measures of self-efficacy and spousal support for their own exercise and healthy eating behaviors. We fit a multivariable regression model to examine the relationship between these factors and patient weight. Patients were 95% males and 65% Whites, with average age of 61 years (SD = 12) and weight of 212 lbs (SD = 42). Spouses were 64% Whites, with average age of 59 years (SD = 12). Factors associated with lower patient weight were older patient age (estimate = -0.8 lbs, p < .01), normal blood pressure (estimate = -17.6 lbs, p < .01), higher patient self-efficacy for eating healthy (estimate = -3.8 lbs, p = .02), and spouse greater perceived support for eating healthy (estimate = -10.0 lbs, p = .03). Future research should explore the causal pathways between perceived support and health outcomes to establish whether patient support behaviors could be a point of intervention for weight management.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Gallagher, P; Yancy, WS; Jeffreys, AS; Coffman, CJ; Weinberger, M; Bosworth, HB; Voils, CI

Published Date

  • 2013

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 18 / 2

Start / End Page

  • 175 - 181

PubMed ID

  • 22963235

Pubmed Central ID

  • 22963235

Electronic International Standard Serial Number (EISSN)

  • 1465-3966

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1080/13548506.2012.715176

Language

  • eng

Conference Location

  • England