Cholera in Haiti and other Caribbean regions, 19th century.

Journal Article

Medical journals and other sources do not show evidence that cholera occurred in Haiti before 2010, despite the devastating effect of this disease in the Caribbean region in the 19th century. Cholera occurred in Cuba in 1833-1834; in Jamaica, Cuba, Puerto Rico, St. Thomas, St. Lucia, St. Kitts, Nevis, Trinidad, the Bahamas, St. Vincent, Granada, Anguilla, St. John, Tortola, the Turks and Caicos, the Grenadines (Carriacou and Petite Martinique), and possibly Antigua in 1850-1856; and in Guadeloupe, Cuba, St. Thomas, the Dominican Republic, Dominica, Martinique, and Marie Galante in 1865-1872. Conditions associated with slavery and colonial military control were absent in independent Haiti. Clustered populations, regular influx of new persons, and close quarters of barracks living contributed to spread of cholera in other Caribbean locations. We provide historical accounts of the presence and spread of cholera epidemics in Caribbean islands.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Jenson, D; Szabo, V; Duke FHI Haiti Humanities Laboratory Student Research Team,

Published Date

  • November 2011

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 17 / 11

Start / End Page

  • 2130 - 2135

PubMed ID

  • 22099117

Electronic International Standard Serial Number (EISSN)

  • 1080-6059

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.3201/eid1711.110958

Language

  • eng

Conference Location

  • United States