Skip to main content
construction release_alert
Scholars@Duke will be undergoing maintenance April 11-15. Some features may be unavailable during this time.
cancel
Journal cover image

Accuracy of endoscopic intraoperative assessment of urologic stone size.

Publication ,  Journal Article
Patel, N; Chew, B; Knudsen, B; Lipkin, M; Wenzler, D; Sur, RL
Published in: J Endourol
May 2014

INTRODUCTION: Endoscopic treatment of renal calculi relies on surgeon assessment of residual stone fragment size for either basket removal or for the passage of fragments postoperatively. We therefore sought to determine the accuracy of endoscopic assessment of renal calculi size. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Between January and May 2013, five board-certified endourologists participated in an ex vivo artificial endoscopic simulation. A total of 10 stones (pebbles) were measured (mm) by nonparticipating urologist (N.D.P.) with electronic calibers and placed into separate labeled opaque test tubes to prevent visualization of the stones through the side of the tube. Endourologists were blinded to the actual size of the stones. A flexible digital ureteroscope with a 200-μm core sized laser fiber in the working channel as a size reference was placed through the ureteroscope into the test tube to estimate the stone size (mm). Accuracy was determined by obtaining the correlation coefficient (r) and constructing an Altman-Bland plot. RESULTS: Endourologists tended to overestimate actual stone size by a margin of 0.05 mm. The Pearson correlation coefficient was r=0.924, with a p-value<0.01. The estimation of small stones (<4 mm) had a greater accuracy than large stones (≥4 mm), r=0.911 vs r=0.666. Altman-bland plot analysis suggests that surgeons are able to accurately estimate stone size within a range of -1.8 to +1.9 mm. CONCLUSIONS: This ex vivo simulation study demonstrates that endoscopic assessment is reliable when assessing stone size. On average, there was a slight tendency to overestimate stone size by 0.05 mm. Most endourologists could visually estimate stone size within 2 mm of the actual size. These findings could be generalized to state that endourologists are accurately able to intraoperatively assess residual stone fragment size to guide decision making.

Duke Scholars

Altmetric Attention Stats
Dimensions Citation Stats

Published In

J Endourol

DOI

EISSN

1557-900X

Publication Date

May 2014

Volume

28

Issue

5

Start / End Page

582 / 586

Location

United States

Related Subject Headings

  • Urology & Nephrology
  • Urology
  • Urolithiasis
  • Ureteroscopy
  • Ureteroscopes
  • Reference Values
  • Middle Aged
  • Male
  • Intraoperative Period
  • Humans
 

Citation

APA
Chicago
ICMJE
MLA
NLM
Patel, N., Chew, B., Knudsen, B., Lipkin, M., Wenzler, D., & Sur, R. L. (2014). Accuracy of endoscopic intraoperative assessment of urologic stone size. J Endourol, 28(5), 582–586. https://doi.org/10.1089/end.2013.0707
Patel, Nishant, Ben Chew, Bodo Knudsen, Michael Lipkin, David Wenzler, and Roger L. Sur. “Accuracy of endoscopic intraoperative assessment of urologic stone size.J Endourol 28, no. 5 (May 2014): 582–86. https://doi.org/10.1089/end.2013.0707.
Patel N, Chew B, Knudsen B, Lipkin M, Wenzler D, Sur RL. Accuracy of endoscopic intraoperative assessment of urologic stone size. J Endourol. 2014 May;28(5):582–6.
Patel, Nishant, et al. “Accuracy of endoscopic intraoperative assessment of urologic stone size.J Endourol, vol. 28, no. 5, May 2014, pp. 582–86. Pubmed, doi:10.1089/end.2013.0707.
Patel N, Chew B, Knudsen B, Lipkin M, Wenzler D, Sur RL. Accuracy of endoscopic intraoperative assessment of urologic stone size. J Endourol. 2014 May;28(5):582–586.
Journal cover image

Published In

J Endourol

DOI

EISSN

1557-900X

Publication Date

May 2014

Volume

28

Issue

5

Start / End Page

582 / 586

Location

United States

Related Subject Headings

  • Urology & Nephrology
  • Urology
  • Urolithiasis
  • Ureteroscopy
  • Ureteroscopes
  • Reference Values
  • Middle Aged
  • Male
  • Intraoperative Period
  • Humans