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Social inequalities in BMI trajectories: 8-year follow-up of the Pró-Saúde study in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

Publication ,  Journal Article
Chor, D; Andreozzi, V; Fonseca, MJM; Cardoso, LO; James, SA; Lopes, CS; Faerstein, E
Published in: Public health nutrition
December 2015

In a cohort of government employees in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, we investigated prospectively, sex-specific associations between education and BMI trajectories and their potential effect modification by race.Of the 4030 participants in Phase 1 (1999), 3253 (81 %) participated in Phase 2 (2003) and 3058 (76 %) participated in Phase 3 (2006). Education was categorized as elementary, high school or college graduate. Study participants self-identified as White, Black or Pardo. BMI was calculated from measured weight and height. BMI trajectories were modelled using a generalized additive regression model with mixed effects (GAMM).The Pro-Saúde Study, a longitudinal investigation of social determinants of health.Women (n 1441) and men (n 1127) who participated in the three phases of data collection and had complete information for all study variables.Women and men with less than high school, or only a high school education, gained approximately 1 kg/m(2) more than college graduates (women: 1·06 kg/m(2) (P<0·001) and 1·06 kg/m(2) (P<0·001), respectively; men: 1·04 kg/m(2) (P=0·013) and 1·01 kg/m(2) (P=0·277), respectively). For women only, race was independently associated with weight gain. Women identifying as Pardo or Black gained 1·03 kg/m(2) (P=0·01) and 1·02 kg/m(2) (P=0·10), respectively, more than Whites. No effect modification by race was observed for either men or women.While both lower education and darker race were associated with greater weight gain, gender similarities and differences were observed in these associations. The relationship between weight gain and different indicators of social status are therefore complex and require careful consideration when addressing the obesity epidemic.

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Published In

Public health nutrition

DOI

EISSN

1475-2727

ISSN

1368-9800

Publication Date

December 2015

Volume

18

Issue

17

Start / End Page

3183 / 3191

Related Subject Headings

  • Weight Gain
  • Urban Health
  • Socioeconomic Factors
  • Sex Factors
  • Overweight
  • Obesity
  • Nutritional Status
  • Nutrition & Dietetics
  • Middle Aged
  • Male
 

Citation

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Chicago
ICMJE
MLA
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Chor, D., Andreozzi, V., Fonseca, M. J. M., Cardoso, L. O., James, S. A., Lopes, C. S., & Faerstein, E. (2015). Social inequalities in BMI trajectories: 8-year follow-up of the Pró-Saúde study in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Public Health Nutrition, 18(17), 3183–3191. https://doi.org/10.1017/s1368980015001032
Chor, Dóra, Valeska Andreozzi, Maria J. M. Fonseca, Letícia O. Cardoso, Sherman A. James, Claudia S. Lopes, and Eduardo Faerstein. “Social inequalities in BMI trajectories: 8-year follow-up of the Pró-Saúde study in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.Public Health Nutrition 18, no. 17 (December 2015): 3183–91. https://doi.org/10.1017/s1368980015001032.
Chor D, Andreozzi V, Fonseca MJM, Cardoso LO, James SA, Lopes CS, et al. Social inequalities in BMI trajectories: 8-year follow-up of the Pró-Saúde study in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Public health nutrition. 2015 Dec;18(17):3183–91.
Chor, Dóra, et al. “Social inequalities in BMI trajectories: 8-year follow-up of the Pró-Saúde study in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.Public Health Nutrition, vol. 18, no. 17, Dec. 2015, pp. 3183–91. Epmc, doi:10.1017/s1368980015001032.
Chor D, Andreozzi V, Fonseca MJM, Cardoso LO, James SA, Lopes CS, Faerstein E. Social inequalities in BMI trajectories: 8-year follow-up of the Pró-Saúde study in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Public health nutrition. 2015 Dec;18(17):3183–3191.
Journal cover image

Published In

Public health nutrition

DOI

EISSN

1475-2727

ISSN

1368-9800

Publication Date

December 2015

Volume

18

Issue

17

Start / End Page

3183 / 3191

Related Subject Headings

  • Weight Gain
  • Urban Health
  • Socioeconomic Factors
  • Sex Factors
  • Overweight
  • Obesity
  • Nutritional Status
  • Nutrition & Dietetics
  • Middle Aged
  • Male