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The Future of Criminology

Self-Control, Then and Now

Publication ,  Chapter
Moffitt, TE
September 20, 2012

This chapter advances the need to improve the physical and financial health of populations and reduce crime. It focuses on the role of poor self-control in predicting delinquency, health outcomes, substance use dependence, and financial wealth, providing supporting data from the Dunedin longitudinal study and the Environmental-Risk Longitudinal Twin Study. The role of sibling comparisons is stressed to examine differences in self-control among siblings reared in the same family environment. The findings are highly relevant for future intervention programs aimed at enhancing self-control at all levels in the population.

Duke Scholars

DOI

ISBN

9780199917938

Publication Date

September 20, 2012
 

Citation

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Moffitt, T. E. (2012). Self-Control, Then and Now. In The Future of Criminology. https://doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199917938.003.0005
Moffitt, T. E. “Self-Control, Then and Now.” In The Future of Criminology, 2012. https://doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199917938.003.0005.
Moffitt TE. Self-Control, Then and Now. In: The Future of Criminology. 2012.
Moffitt, T. E. “Self-Control, Then and Now.” The Future of Criminology, 2012. Scopus, doi:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199917938.003.0005.
Moffitt TE. Self-Control, Then and Now. The Future of Criminology. 2012.
Journal cover image

DOI

ISBN

9780199917938

Publication Date

September 20, 2012