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Medication monitoring and drug testing ethics project.

Publication ,  Journal Article
Payne, R; Moe, JL; Sevier, CH; Sevier, D; Waitzkin, M
Published in: J Opioid Manag
2015

In 2012, Duke University initiated a research project, funded by an unrestricted research grant from Millennium Laboratories, a drug testing company. The project focused on assessing the frequency and nature of questionable, unethical, and illegal business practices in the clinical drug testing industry and assessing the potential for establishing a business code of ethics. Laboratory leaders, clinicians, industry attorneys, ethicists, and consultants participated in the survey, were interviewed, and attended two face-to-face meetings to discuss a way forward. The study demonstrated broad acknowledgment of variations in the legal and regulatory environment, resulting in inconsistent enforcement of industry practices. Study participants expressed agreement that overtly illegal practices sometimes exist, particularly when laboratory representatives and clinicians discuss reimbursement, extent of testing, and potential business incentives with medical practitioners. Most respondents reported directly observing probable violations involving marketing materials, contracts, or, in the case of some individuals, directly soliciting people with offers of clinical supplies and other "freebies." While many study respondents were skeptical that voluntary standards alone would eliminate questionable business practices, most viewed ethics codes and credentialing as an important first step that could potentially mitigate uneven enforcement, while improving quality of care and facilitating preferred payment options for credentialed parties. Many were willing to participate in future discussions and industry-wide initiatives to improve the environment.

Duke Scholars

Published In

J Opioid Manag

DOI

ISSN

1551-7489

Publication Date

2015

Volume

11

Issue

1

Start / End Page

82 / 88

Location

United States

Related Subject Headings

  • Surveys and Questionnaires
  • Substance-Related Disorders
  • Substance Abuse Detection
  • Reproducibility of Results
  • Program Evaluation
  • Program Development
  • Predictive Value of Tests
  • North Carolina
  • Medication Adherence
  • Marketing of Health Services
 

Citation

APA
Chicago
ICMJE
MLA
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Payne, R., Moe, J. L., Sevier, C. H., Sevier, D., & Waitzkin, M. (2015). Medication monitoring and drug testing ethics project. J Opioid Manag, 11(1), 82–88. https://doi.org/10.5055/jom.2015.0256
Payne, Richard, Jeffrey L. Moe, Catherine Harvey Sevier, David Sevier, and Michael Waitzkin. “Medication monitoring and drug testing ethics project.J Opioid Manag 11, no. 1 (2015): 82–88. https://doi.org/10.5055/jom.2015.0256.
Payne R, Moe JL, Sevier CH, Sevier D, Waitzkin M. Medication monitoring and drug testing ethics project. J Opioid Manag. 2015;11(1):82–8.
Payne, Richard, et al. “Medication monitoring and drug testing ethics project.J Opioid Manag, vol. 11, no. 1, 2015, pp. 82–88. Pubmed, doi:10.5055/jom.2015.0256.
Payne R, Moe JL, Sevier CH, Sevier D, Waitzkin M. Medication monitoring and drug testing ethics project. J Opioid Manag. 2015;11(1):82–88.

Published In

J Opioid Manag

DOI

ISSN

1551-7489

Publication Date

2015

Volume

11

Issue

1

Start / End Page

82 / 88

Location

United States

Related Subject Headings

  • Surveys and Questionnaires
  • Substance-Related Disorders
  • Substance Abuse Detection
  • Reproducibility of Results
  • Program Evaluation
  • Program Development
  • Predictive Value of Tests
  • North Carolina
  • Medication Adherence
  • Marketing of Health Services