Skip to main content
construction release_alert
Scholars@Duke will be undergoing maintenance April 11-15. Some features may be unavailable during this time.
cancel
Journal cover image

Mouse handling limits the impact of stress on metabolic endpoints.

Publication ,  Journal Article
Ghosal, S; Nunley, A; Mahbod, P; Lewis, AG; Smith, EP; Tong, J; D'Alessio, DA; Herman, JP
Published in: Physiol Behav
October 15, 2015

Studies focused on end-points that are confounded by stress are best performed under minimally stressful conditions. The objective of this study was to demonstrate the impact of handling designed to reduce animal stress on measurements of glucose tolerance. A cohort of mice (CD1.C57BL/6) naïve to any specific handling was subjected to either a previously described "cup" handling method, or a "tail-picked" method in which the animals were picked up by the tail (as is common for metabolic studies). Following training, an elevated plus maze (EPM) test was performed followed by measurement of blood glucose and plasma corticosterone. A second cohort (CD1.C57BL/6) was rendered obese by exposure to a high fat diet, handled with either the tail-picked or cup method and subjected to an intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test. A third cohort of C57BL/6 mice was exposed to a cup regimen that included a component of massage and was subjected to tests of anxiety-like behavior, glucose homeostasis, and corticosterone secretion. We found that the cup mice showed reduced anxiety-like behaviors in the EPM coupled with a reduction in blood glucose levels compared to mice handled by the tail-picked method. Additionally, cup mice on the high fat diet exhibited improved glucose tolerance compared to tail-picked controls. Finally, we found that the cup/massage group showed lower glucose levels following an overnight fast, and decreased anxiety-like behaviors associated with lower stress-induced plasma corticosterone concentration compared to tail-picked controls. These data demonstrate that application of handling methods that reduce anxiety-like behaviors in mice mitigates the confounding contribution of stress to interpretation of metabolic endpoints (such as glucose tolerance).

Duke Scholars

Altmetric Attention Stats
Dimensions Citation Stats

Published In

Physiol Behav

DOI

EISSN

1873-507X

Publication Date

October 15, 2015

Volume

150

Start / End Page

31 / 37

Location

United States

Related Subject Headings

  • Stress, Psychological
  • Mice, Inbred C57BL
  • Mice
  • Maze Learning
  • Massage
  • Male
  • Handling, Psychological
  • Glucose Tolerance Test
  • Fasting
  • Exploratory Behavior
 

Citation

APA
Chicago
ICMJE
MLA
NLM
Ghosal, S., Nunley, A., Mahbod, P., Lewis, A. G., Smith, E. P., Tong, J., … Herman, J. P. (2015). Mouse handling limits the impact of stress on metabolic endpoints. Physiol Behav, 150, 31–37. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.physbeh.2015.06.021
Ghosal, Sriparna, Amanda Nunley, Parinaz Mahbod, Alfor G. Lewis, Eric P. Smith, Jenny Tong, David A. D’Alessio, and James P. Herman. “Mouse handling limits the impact of stress on metabolic endpoints.Physiol Behav 150 (October 15, 2015): 31–37. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.physbeh.2015.06.021.
Ghosal S, Nunley A, Mahbod P, Lewis AG, Smith EP, Tong J, et al. Mouse handling limits the impact of stress on metabolic endpoints. Physiol Behav. 2015 Oct 15;150:31–7.
Ghosal, Sriparna, et al. “Mouse handling limits the impact of stress on metabolic endpoints.Physiol Behav, vol. 150, Oct. 2015, pp. 31–37. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/j.physbeh.2015.06.021.
Ghosal S, Nunley A, Mahbod P, Lewis AG, Smith EP, Tong J, D’Alessio DA, Herman JP. Mouse handling limits the impact of stress on metabolic endpoints. Physiol Behav. 2015 Oct 15;150:31–37.
Journal cover image

Published In

Physiol Behav

DOI

EISSN

1873-507X

Publication Date

October 15, 2015

Volume

150

Start / End Page

31 / 37

Location

United States

Related Subject Headings

  • Stress, Psychological
  • Mice, Inbred C57BL
  • Mice
  • Maze Learning
  • Massage
  • Male
  • Handling, Psychological
  • Glucose Tolerance Test
  • Fasting
  • Exploratory Behavior