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Genetic variants in the H2AFX promoter region are associated with risk of sporadic breast cancer in non-Hispanic white women aged

Publication ,  Journal Article
Lu, J; Wei, Q; Bondy, ML; Brewster, AM; Bevers, TB; Yu, T-K; Buchholz, TA; Meric-Bernstam, F; Hunt, KK; Singletary, SE; Wang, L-E
Published in: Breast Cancer Res Treat
July 2008

The histone protein family member X (H2AFX) is important in maintaining chromatin structure and genetic stability. Genetic variants in H2AFX may alter protein functions and thus cancer risk. In this case-control study, we genotyped four common single nucleotide polymorphisms (i.e., -1654A > G [rs643788], -1420G > A [rs8551], and -1187T > C [rs7759] in the H2AFX promoter region and 1057C > T [rs7350] in the 3' untranslated region (UTR)) in 467 patients with sporadic breast cancer and 488 cancer-free controls. All female subjects were non-Hispanic whites aged T polymorphism. Therefore, we believe that H2AFX promoter polymorphisms may contribute to the etiology of sporadic breast cancer in young non-Hispanic white women. Larger association studies and related functional studies are warranted to confirm these findings.

Duke Scholars

Published In

Breast Cancer Res Treat

DOI

EISSN

1573-7217

Publication Date

July 2008

Volume

110

Issue

2

Start / End Page

357 / 366

Location

Netherlands

Related Subject Headings

  • White People
  • Risk
  • Promoter Regions, Genetic
  • Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
  • Oncology & Carcinogenesis
  • Middle Aged
  • Humans
  • Histones
  • Genetic Variation
  • Genetic Predisposition to Disease
 

Citation

APA
Chicago
ICMJE
MLA
NLM

Published In

Breast Cancer Res Treat

DOI

EISSN

1573-7217

Publication Date

July 2008

Volume

110

Issue

2

Start / End Page

357 / 366

Location

Netherlands

Related Subject Headings

  • White People
  • Risk
  • Promoter Regions, Genetic
  • Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
  • Oncology & Carcinogenesis
  • Middle Aged
  • Humans
  • Histones
  • Genetic Variation
  • Genetic Predisposition to Disease