Skip to main content
Journal cover image

Megafauna and ecosystem function from the Pleistocene to the Anthropocene.

Publication ,  Journal Article
Malhi, Y; Doughty, CE; Galetti, M; Smith, FA; Svenning, J-C; Terborgh, JW
Published in: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
January 2016

Large herbivores and carnivores (the megafauna) have been in a state of decline and extinction since the Late Pleistocene, both on land and more recently in the oceans. Much has been written on the timing and causes of these declines, but only recently has scientific attention focused on the consequences of these declines for ecosystem function. Here, we review progress in our understanding of how megafauna affect ecosystem physical and trophic structure, species composition, biogeochemistry, and climate, drawing on special features of PNAS and Ecography that have been published as a result of an international workshop on this topic held in Oxford in 2014. Insights emerging from this work have consequences for our understanding of changes in biosphere function since the Late Pleistocene and of the functioning of contemporary ecosystems, as well as offering a rationale and framework for scientifically informed restoration of megafaunal function where possible and appropriate.

Duke Scholars

Altmetric Attention Stats
Dimensions Citation Stats

Published In

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America

DOI

EISSN

1091-6490

ISSN

0027-8424

Publication Date

January 2016

Volume

113

Issue

4

Start / End Page

838 / 846

Related Subject Headings

  • Phylogeography
  • Mammals
  • Human Migration
  • Human Activities
  • History, Ancient
  • Herbivory
  • Extinction, Biological
  • Endangered Species
  • Ecosystem
  • Earth, Planet
 

Citation

APA
Chicago
ICMJE
MLA
NLM
Malhi, Y., Doughty, C. E., Galetti, M., Smith, F. A., Svenning, J.-C., & Terborgh, J. W. (2016). Megafauna and ecosystem function from the Pleistocene to the Anthropocene. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 113(4), 838–846. https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1502540113
Malhi, Yadvinder, Christopher E. Doughty, Mauro Galetti, Felisa A. Smith, Jens-Christian Svenning, and John W. Terborgh. “Megafauna and ecosystem function from the Pleistocene to the Anthropocene.Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 113, no. 4 (January 2016): 838–46. https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1502540113.
Malhi Y, Doughty CE, Galetti M, Smith FA, Svenning J-C, Terborgh JW. Megafauna and ecosystem function from the Pleistocene to the Anthropocene. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. 2016 Jan;113(4):838–46.
Malhi, Yadvinder, et al. “Megafauna and ecosystem function from the Pleistocene to the Anthropocene.Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, vol. 113, no. 4, Jan. 2016, pp. 838–46. Epmc, doi:10.1073/pnas.1502540113.
Malhi Y, Doughty CE, Galetti M, Smith FA, Svenning J-C, Terborgh JW. Megafauna and ecosystem function from the Pleistocene to the Anthropocene. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. 2016 Jan;113(4):838–846.
Journal cover image

Published In

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America

DOI

EISSN

1091-6490

ISSN

0027-8424

Publication Date

January 2016

Volume

113

Issue

4

Start / End Page

838 / 846

Related Subject Headings

  • Phylogeography
  • Mammals
  • Human Migration
  • Human Activities
  • History, Ancient
  • Herbivory
  • Extinction, Biological
  • Endangered Species
  • Ecosystem
  • Earth, Planet