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Prevalence and causes of vision loss in sub-Saharan Africa: 1990-2010.

Publication ,  Journal Article
Naidoo, K; Gichuhi, S; Basáñez, M-G; Flaxman, SR; Jonas, JB; Keeffe, J; Leasher, JL; Pesudovs, K; Price, H; Smith, JL; Turner, HC; White, RA ...
Published in: Br J Ophthalmol
May 2014

AIM: To estimate the magnitude, temporal trends and subregional variation in the prevalence of blindness, and moderate/severe vision impairment (MSVI) in sub-Saharan Africa. METHODS: A systematic review was conducted of published and unpublished population-based surveys as part of the Global Burden of Disease, Risk Factors and Injuries Study 2010. The prevalence of blindness and vision impairment by country and subregion was estimated. RESULTS: In sub-Saharan Africa, 52 studies satisfied the inclusion criteria. The estimated age-standardised prevalence of blindness decreased by 32% from 1.9% (95% CI 1.5% to 2.2%) in 1990 to 1.3% (95% CI 1.1% to 1.5%) in 2010 and MSVI by 25% from 5.3% (95% CI 0.2% to 0.3%) to 4.0% (95% CI 0.2% to 0.3%) over that time. However, there was a 16% increase in the absolute numbers with blindness and a 28% increase in those with MSVI. The major causes of blindness in 2010 were; cataract 35%, other/unidentified causes 33.1%, refractive error 13.2%, macular degeneration 6.3%, trachoma 5.2%, glaucoma 4.4% and diabetic retinopathy 2.8%. In 2010, age-standardised prevalence of MSVI in Africa was 3.8% (95% CI 3.1% to 4.7%) for men and 4.2% (95% CI 3.6% to 5.3%) for women with subregional variations from 4.1% (95% CI 3.3% to 5.4%) in West Africa to 2.0% (95% CI 1.5% to 3.3%) in southern Africa for men; and 4.7% (95% CI 3.9% to 6.0%) in West Africa to 2.3% (95% CI 1.7% to 3.8%) in southern Africa for women. CONCLUSIONS: The age-standardised prevalence of blindness and MSVI decreased substantially from 1990 to 2010, although there was a moderate increase in the absolute numbers with blindness or MSVI. Significant subregional and gender disparities exist.

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Published In

Br J Ophthalmol

DOI

EISSN

1468-2079

Publication Date

May 2014

Volume

98

Issue

5

Start / End Page

612 / 618

Location

England

Related Subject Headings

  • Risk Factors
  • Prevalence
  • Ophthalmology & Optometry
  • Humans
  • Eye Diseases
  • Blindness
  • Black People
  • Africa South of the Sahara
  • 3212 Ophthalmology and optometry
  • 3202 Clinical sciences
 

Citation

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Naidoo, K., Gichuhi, S., Basáñez, M.-G., Flaxman, S. R., Jonas, J. B., Keeffe, J., … Vision Loss Expert Group of the Global Burden of Disease Study, . (2014). Prevalence and causes of vision loss in sub-Saharan Africa: 1990-2010. Br J Ophthalmol, 98(5), 612–618. https://doi.org/10.1136/bjophthalmol-2013-304081
Naidoo, Kovin, Stephen Gichuhi, María-Gloria Basáñez, Seth R. Flaxman, Jost B. Jonas, Jill Keeffe, Janet L. Leasher, et al. “Prevalence and causes of vision loss in sub-Saharan Africa: 1990-2010.Br J Ophthalmol 98, no. 5 (May 2014): 612–18. https://doi.org/10.1136/bjophthalmol-2013-304081.
Naidoo K, Gichuhi S, Basáñez M-G, Flaxman SR, Jonas JB, Keeffe J, et al. Prevalence and causes of vision loss in sub-Saharan Africa: 1990-2010. Br J Ophthalmol. 2014 May;98(5):612–8.
Naidoo, Kovin, et al. “Prevalence and causes of vision loss in sub-Saharan Africa: 1990-2010.Br J Ophthalmol, vol. 98, no. 5, May 2014, pp. 612–18. Pubmed, doi:10.1136/bjophthalmol-2013-304081.
Naidoo K, Gichuhi S, Basáñez M-G, Flaxman SR, Jonas JB, Keeffe J, Leasher JL, Pesudovs K, Price H, Smith JL, Turner HC, White RA, Wong TY, Resnikoff S, Taylor HR, Bourne RRA, Vision Loss Expert Group of the Global Burden of Disease Study. Prevalence and causes of vision loss in sub-Saharan Africa: 1990-2010. Br J Ophthalmol. 2014 May;98(5):612–618.

Published In

Br J Ophthalmol

DOI

EISSN

1468-2079

Publication Date

May 2014

Volume

98

Issue

5

Start / End Page

612 / 618

Location

England

Related Subject Headings

  • Risk Factors
  • Prevalence
  • Ophthalmology & Optometry
  • Humans
  • Eye Diseases
  • Blindness
  • Black People
  • Africa South of the Sahara
  • 3212 Ophthalmology and optometry
  • 3202 Clinical sciences